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Today's Opinions

  • Daulbaugh's history reason for optimism

    Amber Daulbaugh will admit that she has a lot to learn in the area of economic development, but she will also tell you that she will make every effort to become educated in that area.
    Daulbaugh will also tell you that she believes she can be succesful in the position of director of economic development for the city of Vandalia. And her work history supports that.
    We have to admit that the city's hiring of Daulbaugh, who has been the program director for the Family YMCA of Fayette County, was a surprise.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week's photos: The three sisters in this week's photo, which was taken in the mid-1960s, are part of a large family with 13 children.

  • Thefts at cemetery need to be put to a stop

    Editor,
    When I went to the cemetery to put flowers on my fathers’ grave for Father’s Day, the red bird house that had been hanging on a shepherd’s hook was gone.
    I was in shock and tears to think that someone would take the memento that has meant so much to my family, a little wren house that my mom had hung up in the backyard for years. We think the same family of wrens came back to the place where they always felt safe.

  • Vandalia Memories
  • Revolutionary soliders with local ties

    As we prepare to celebrate the Fourth of July, it seems a good time to look back to the men who were there for the American Revolution of 1776 and later settled in Fayette County.
    The veterans who eventually moved to the “far west” of Illinois were from various states, and as we study the names, we see the family names still represented within our county.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week's photos: These siblings, pictured in the early 1950s, all graduated from Vandalia Community High School, but all now live out of state. Their younger brother also graduated from VCHS and still lives in Vandalia; his youngest son graduated from VCHS this year.

  • Lincoln jumped, but not in Vandalia

    According to legend, Abraham Lincoln jumped from the second floor of the Vandalia Statehouse in order to defeat a quorum. In fact, postcards were printed with “X” marking the spot from which he leaped.

  • Vandalia Memories