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Today's Features

  • Countless books have been written and illustrated on dog training. Some are very serious manuals, with professional, no-nonsense attitudes and instructions, accompanied by photos of elite-looking models (both handlers and canines).

    There are also those that focus mainly on new puppy behavior and toilet training.

    Then there are the lighter instructional manuals with a humorous slant, illustrated with humorous caricatures.

  • It is documented that on Feb. 6, 1898, six men sitting on a lumber pile in a shipyard in Seattle, Wash., decided to form an organization that, while providing activities and events for its members, would also focus on helping other individuals, communities and the nation.

    Starting out as a fledgling project, they called it the Order of Good Things. As it grew, and after its formal organization, the name was changed to Fraternal Order of Eagles.

  • Anthony Workman was a typical 16-year-old boy who enjoyed baseball and other outdoor activities, especially hunting.

    Then he had a bout with a virus that changed his life about a year ago. It left Anthony with marked physical changes, such as tiredness, weakness and a feeling of always being cold, even during hot weather. His dad described him as boy formerly built like a football player who suddenly began losing weight.

  • Dave Arnold, custodian at Brownstown Elementary School, is well known as the “school custodian poet,” not only in this area, but also far and wide in the nation’s public schools network and associations.

    He also is known for his moral standards, sense of humor, generosity and various other gifts and talents, such as woodworking.

    Dave’s love for his job as the elementary school custodian and his respect, support and understanding for the teachers and school officials is also notable, as is his rapport with the children.

  • Every year for the past 20 years, Don and Ellie Funk have graciously hosted a favorite, famous and beloved guest in their lakeside home.

    He usually appears in the second week of December and stays until he has to return to the North Pole to make his toys and gifts run on Christmas Eve.

    He travels light, with few personal items, as he never seems to shave, and always wears the same style of clothing.

    However, he does bring reindeer along with him, for which the Funks have graciously provided a shelter.

  • To sit in on a casual conversation with Dale “Pete” Burnam and Glen “Whitey” Daniels, one would think the two were highly incompatible.

    As they volley insults back and forth, however, it soon becomes clear they actually share a close, brotherly-love-like friendship and have the utmost respect for one another.

    When not harassing one another, they are quick with compliments, credits and tributes to the other.

  • When it was learned that World War II veteran John C. Sefton was honored as a participant of the Central Illinois Honor Flight to Washington D.C., on Oct. 14, a request was made to him for a report of the event.

    John modestly, but graciously, agreed to meet in his home in Sefton, which is just across the road from where he was born 85 years ago. John grew up in a two-story house that no longer stands.

  • Born in Bingham on April 30, 1913, Lucille Fisher has lived a long and fruitful life – fruitful for her friends, her neighbors, her community, the organizations to which she still belongs (and contributes to), and especially her family, which enjoys a closeness, respect and love for one another that is heart-warming to witness.

  • Herb Woolsey was released from active duty with the Army Infantry in September 1953. However, in early 1954, an armored tank unit in Vandalia needed a company commander, and Woolsey was asked to take the job.

    He did and remained with the reserve unit as the commander until June 30, 1985, when it was disbanded. He served 34 years in the service and retired a colonel. An all-American patriot, he is often asked to speak at Memorial Day and Veterans Day events.

  • When Charlie Durbin was a young boy living on his parents’ farm, he knew that he wanted to be a veterinarian. He also knew that he especially wanted to work with cattle.

    Last Tuesday evening, Dr. Charlie R. Durbin hosted a community cookout in St.Peter City Park in celebration of 25 years in St. Peter doing just what that little 8-year-old boy dreamed of … and more.

    He has served all of Fayette County, including serving 15 years on the Fayette County Fair Board and as the county fair veterinarian, a position he still holds.