Today's Opinions

  • Some early facts about Farina

    The village of Farina began as a station on the Chicago Branch of the Illinois Central Railroad. It was surveyed by James Carson on Nov. 9, 1857, and a post office opened the following year, with William L. Dillon as postmaster. It is not known who chose the name.

  • Be safe on the Fourth

    It's a three-day, midsummer celebration likely to be full of picnics, barbecues, boating and other outdoor activities. It's also something that can turn tragic in a second.
    According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 200 people, on average, go to the emergency room with injuries caused by fireworks around the Fourth of July.
    Of those injured, 40 percent are between the ages of 25 and 44, and 14 percent are in the 45-64 age range. Twenty percent of those injured are between the ages of 10 and 19.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    There is no photo this week.
    There was no photo last week.
    This week’s Scrambler: lal nhtsgi rea slbpeiso ot mih atht elhvibete.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: Creativity has a lot to do with a willingness to take risks.

  • The Way We Were

    25 Years Ago

    1990 –  The Vandalia Community High School Class of 1927 held its ninth and final class reunion.
    Gertrude Rosenberger of Ramsey was HEA’s “Homemaker of the Year.”
    Mary Peyton Meyer, Frogtown’s most popular resident and a Leader-Union area correspondent, was one of 20 people to be pictured on the cover of a Parade magazine that inserted in many daily metropolitan newspapers. The article was entitled, “What People Earn.” Meyer’s earnings were $3,900 as a substitute teacher.

  • Vandalia Memories

    Officers, directors and male employees of Farmers and Merchants Bank in Vandalia are shown in a photo taken on Aug. 13, 1959.

    The photo was provided by Jim Staff of Vandalia. In front, from left to right, are Bill Welker, Art Buser, Ira Lakin, Joe Burtschi and Coral Brooks. In back are Harry Craycroft, Bill Rademacher, Charles Evans, Wilbur "Wempy" Cains, Darrell Isbell, C.C. "Cornie" Brauer, M.S. "Mack" McGlasson, Don McKellar and Charles Schulte.

  • Some Bluff City School history

    As the 1938 Bluff City School Reunion approached, P.C. Bascom, a former early resident, was contacted regarding his earliest memories of the school. His response by letter and dated Aug. 8, 1938, was published in The Vandalia Union and contained the earliest history to date on this school.
    Son of Schuyler Stone Bascom and his second wife, Mariah Smith, Perry Carley Bascom was living in Boundbrook, N.J., when he was contacted about the upcoming school reunion. Bascom was a good choice because he first attended school in Bluff City in 1857.

  • Get to work in Springfield

    Remember when the city of Vandalia received a state grant to replace the Johnson Street bridge over the rail line with a flat road surface? How about the grant funds that helped pay for the extension of Sunset Drive from Jefferson Street to Randolph Street?
    Those are just two examples of how far our state has fallen in the past 25 years or so.
    Today, schools aren't getting the funds owed to them, our governor has threatened to take away a big portion of the money owed to municipalities and many important services and programs are on the verge of extinction.

  • Welcome, Law Dogs

    Vandalia will be roaring with the sound of hundreds of motorcycles later this week as Vandalia hosts the national rally of Law Dogs, a motorcycle group made up of people associated with law enforcement and the military.
    It's the second time within two months that we are hosting a national gathering right here in Vandalia.
    That means that our city and its people is doing something right.