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Today's Opinions

  • Take in this year's Grande Leve

    During the period that Vandalia served as Illinois capital, Abraham Lincoln and others who walked these streets couldnt just buy a quilt or a basket. They had to make them.

    The people of Vandalia, back in the 1830s, didnt have a radio or television for entertainment. They had only bands that performed the popular music of that period.

    Illinois earliest residents didnt have restaurants that served fast food or family meals. They had to cook their meals over a fire.

  • Many changes in Shobonier since 1844

    Shobonier, the only town in Kaskaskia Township, was established as a timber town in about 1844.

    It is located in Section 16, the School Section, and the first to buy lots here in 1851 were James Albert, Francis, J. Brown, Stephen Hopkins and George Willet.

    The survey of Shobonier by James R. Oliver was filed with the county as a permanent record on Nov. 20, 1859. The original town was on the west side of the railroad. Three additions, Blackman, Metzger and William Lee, have been made to the town since its beginning.

  • Merchants must save parking for customers

    Sometimes, you wonder why a municipality keeps a law on the books that it doesnt enforce. Vandalia Alderman Jerry Swarm does, too.

    At Mondays meeting of the Vandalia City Council, Swarm said it bothers him that some downtown merchants use parking spaces that would be better used by their customers. It upsets him so much that he asked to get rid of the ordinance that limits parking along Gallatin Street downtown to two hours.

  • Support Relay for Life

    Each year, the people of Fayette County display an unbelieveable degree of generosity as they support the local Relay for Life.

    The annual fundraiser for the American Cancer Society features teams of walkers from throughout the county, raising money to support the fight against cancer.

    Starting at 4:30 p.m. this Saturday and continuing throughout the night, those walkers will be circling the track at Vandalia Community High School.

  • Mary Peyton Meyer was a true original

    She was, without question, an original.

    With a life that spanned 102 years, Mary Peyton Meyer saw a slice of American life that boggles the mind. She, quite literally, saw us move from the horse and buggy days to a time when we can communicate, through cyberspace, with people anywhere in the world. She saw the first automobiles, she saw man walk on the moon, she saw the development of the first computers (though she never saw the need for one to do her reports).

    And through all the changes, Mary exhibited a zest for life that amazed those half her age.

  • Fayette County women in World War I

    Nettie Hunt was the first nurse from Fayette County to see overseas service during World War 1. When America entered the war, Nettie went to St. Louis and volunteered for Red Cross work.

    Henrietta (Nettie) Hunt was born and raised in Carson Township, the youngest daughter of Haroldson Lafayette and Ella Rose Myers Hunt. After graduating eighth grade, Nettie attended the University at Valparaiso, Indiana.

  • St. Elmo does great job of honoring veterans

    When it comes to paying tribute to the men and women who have served this country in the armed forces, both in war and time of peace, the community of St. Elmo has gone all out.

    The committee that raised the necessary funds and saw the town's Veterans' Memorial through to completion presented the finished product to an extremely large crowd during the American Legion Post's Memorial Day program on Monday afternoon.

  • Wait's dream became a reality

    William S. Wait was a visionary who died before he could see his vision become a reality.

    As far back as 1835, Wait, of Greenville, was thinking of a rail line stretching across Illinois from Terre Haute to St. Louis linking Greenville to both Eastern and Western markets.

    He actively lobbied members of the legislature, and got some positive support. But when it came to a vote, the charter was given not to Waits project the Mississippi & Atlantic Railroad but instead to backers of the Alton & Terre Haute Railroad.