.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Wintery blast brings memories of past

    As the first blast of winter hit this week, the memories of past winters – when we had mounds of snow – came to mind. This year, according to the persimmon seed, with its telltale spoon, we should expect to have our snow shovels at the ready.

    The winter of "eighteen hundred and starve-to-death" in 1831, was not the first big freeze experienced in Illinois. An earlier freeze, about 1813, was known as the "year without a summer."

  • City must avoid Motown debt

    It was an impressive array of vendors and contractors that was assembled by Motown Technology for Monday’s meeting with the Vandalia City Council. Participants included representatives of Wyndham Hotel Group, IBM, Select Contracts, Hunt Construction Group, TSI Global and several other design and construction companies.

    One by one, at the invitation of developer Kenneth Bardwell, those representatives told of their expertise and the part they would play in the creation of a proposed $300 million sports and entertainment complex in Vandalia.

  • Don't ride Motown horse too long

    Vandalia’s city administrator last Tuesday night rolled out a number of budget cuts that he was proposing in light of shrinking surpluses and decreasing revenues.

    With that in mind, we hope that the city council takes a long, hard look at the request for an extension being requested for the proposed $300-million sports and entertainment complex.

  • Nurse Mary tells her Civil War stories

    “As a small child, I remember looking up at her and thinking that she was as tall as a tree, especially since she wore long dresses.”

    This comment by her great-granddaughter, Joyce Hamilton, added to the aura of Mary Wren Sharp, who chose to be with her husband during the Civil War, and joined the Seventh Illinois Cavalry as a nurse.

  • Wren Bridge was gathering area for years

    Gary Dycus, from New York City, an occasional Leader-Union reader, e-mailed me recently about a story in his family where his grandmother (Susan Jane Nodine Fair) sold a pig in order to buy her daughter, Lena, material for a silk dress to wear to a special Wren Bridge fish fry. The dress was green and Lena had gorgeous red hair.

    Gary wanted to know who organized this social occasion, how long it ran, how it was advertised, what the people did, what the entertainment was and whether pictures survive.

  • Many reasons to give thanks

    With the economic conditions that we’ve endured in recent months, getting in a Thanksgiving mood may take a little work this year.

    But it shouldn’t.

    In an ideal world, gratitude should be our natural response to the many things we DO have – regardless of our circumstances and the things we DON’T have. Granted, that’s not an easy position to take. Yet, it’s a good approach that produces an attitude of gratitude.

    Here in Vandalia, we have many things for which we should be thankful:

  • Recreation center will be an asset to the area

    As ceremonial shovels were thrust into the ground last Tuesday, a new era was launched for the Family YMCA of Fayette County. And for the city of Vandalia.

    The groundbreaking ceremony, which attracted more than 50 community residents, was the culmination of more than 15 years of efforts to build a community recreation center in Vandalia.

  • Firing of chief may cost city

    A dismissal that had its beginnings in a case involving tall grass may eventually land the city of St. Elmo in deep weeds.

    For 16 years – under five mayors – Ken Thomason has served as St. Elmo’s chief of police. From what is known, his personnel file contains no reprimands, no indications of performance problems.

    Then, two weeks ago – after a flap over the enforcement of the city’s weed ordinance – Mayor Larry Tish presented Thomason with a letter saying that he was being terminated.