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Today's Opinions

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – Jenner & Block, a Chicago law firm representing convicted murderer Stuart Heaton, filed a motion asking for the right to seek additional information it felt would help fight Heaton’s conviction and life imprisonment. Special prosecutor Don Sheafor was arguing that Jenner & Block should be disqualified because it was arguing Heaton was not adequately represented at trial, even though it waived that issue in appellate court.

  • Carrie Nation wielded ax against saloons

    Carrie Nation was a terror to the saloon owners in Kansas, and many fled before her ax.
    Carrie Amelia Moore was born on Nov. 25, 1846, in Garrard County, Ky., and married Dr. Charles Gloyd in 1867. Dr. Gloyd, a veteran of the Civil War was a drunkard, and died soon after their marriage.
    Ten years later, in 1877, she again tied the knot – this time with David Nation, a lawyer, minister and editor. In 1889, the couple moved to Medicine Lodge, Kan.

  • New & improved website unveiled

    If you have been a regular visitor to our website, www.leaderunion.com, you likely already know that we have unveiled a new and improved product.
    If you haven’t been a regular visitor, check it out.
    Our new website offers more content, is much more reader-friendly and allows more opportunities for you, our readers, to participate in our online version of The Leader-Union.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: This woman, born and reared in the Ramsey area, has six children (four daughters and two sons). She loves to bake and clean. She adores angels of many sizes.
    Do you know her? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo was: Bill Morton.
    Identifying him were: Mary Cripe, Donna Taylor, Esther Stine, and Phillip and Phyllis Richards.
    This week’s Scrambler:  kamsiset rea a caft fo feli. ti si het spornees ot eth orrre tath snoctu.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – The auditor for the city of Vandalia, Dale Timmermann, told the Vandalia City Council that it should consider hiking water rates, citing water and sewer deficits.
    The signing of a new operating agreement between Fayette County Hospital and CH Allied Services was scheduled for Sept. 7, and a groundbreaking ceremony for a hospital addition was set for Sept. 8.
    Charles and Yvette Hall of Mulberry Grove were planning to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary.

  • Early visitors to Vandalia give impressions

    In the past, I have written about a German visitor, Frederick Gustorf, who visited Vandalia in 1835. He traveled the National Road and found Vandalia, with a population of 800, “unchanged since it was founded 15 years ago.”
    He continued: “One can see about five or six big frame buildings containing stores.  The statehouse is a common brick building.  A solitary bank, a wooden church, with a small tower, and two or three state offices complete the community of Vandalia.

  • Y building shows power of dreams aided by means

    “So, what do you think?”
    That was the question posed by YMCA Board President Rick Myers to the crowd assembled Saturday at the dedication ceremony for the new building that houses the Family YMCA of Fayette County.
    Spontaneous applause was their reaction to the unveiling of the $1.25 million, 16,952-square-foot facility.

  • The story of Illinois' first governor

    The first governor of Illinois, Shadrach Bond, is an interesting fellow. He was inaugurated on Oct. 6, 1818, before the state was admitted to the Union.

    When the capitol moved from Kaskaskia to Vandalia, so did Shadrach Bond. His wife, Achsah, a strong pro-slavery advocate, did not come with him, but remained on their farm in Monroe County with their slaves.