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Today's Opinions

  • Blankenship's hobby preserved history

    Granville Blankenship was born on April 5, 1890, in Bear Grove Township, the son of Francis Marion Blankenship and Barbara Tirzah Carpenter.
    Barbara was a daughter of Peter and Mary Dickson Carpenter, and came to Illinois with members of her family from Cleveland County, N.C., soon after the death of her father on May 27, 1865, in a Union prisoner of war camp at Point Lookout, Md.

  • Blankenship's hobby preserved history

    Granville Blankenship was born on April 5, 1890, in Bear Grove Township, the son of Francis Marion Blankenship and Barbara Tirzah Carpenter.
    Barbara was a daughter of Peter and Mary Dickson Carpenter, and came to Illinois with members of her family from Cleveland County, N.C., soon after the death of her father on May 27, 1865, in a Union prisoner of war camp at Point Lookout, Md.

  • Keep up search for bypass plan

    Though the Illinois Department of Transportation had already announced its intentions to “take a couple steps back” in the process of determining a route for a U.S. Route 51 bypass around Vandalia, a meeting last Wednesday with more than 125 northside residents gave the engineers a clear sense of the local concerns about the proposed bypass route.
     It was, as state Sen. Kyle McCarter (R-Lebanon) described it, evidence that “democracy works.”

  • Your Opinion

    Editor:
    We want to commend the editorial in the July 22 issue of The Leader-Union.
    We agree that more questions should be asked in this uncertain economy. What used to work in the past does not mean it works today.
    Asking questions may bring about new ideas, a better way of doing things, and maybe even why things are done like this. It may bring to light that this does not have to be done at all.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These three siblings are pictured about 35 years ago. They grew up west of Vandalia. The girl on the left now lives about 60 miles west of here, is married and has four children. They boy in the middle and the girl on the right still live in the area. The boy is single and has one son. The girl is married and has two children.
    Do you know them? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo was: Erma Joy Warner.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – Jenner & Block, a Chicago law firm representing convicted murderer Stuart Heaton, filed a motion asking for the right to seek additional information it felt would help fight Heaton’s conviction and life imprisonment. Special prosecutor Don Sheafor was arguing that Jenner & Block should be disqualified because it was arguing Heaton was not adequately represented at trial, even though it waived that issue in appellate court.

  • Carrie Nation wielded ax against saloons

    Carrie Nation was a terror to the saloon owners in Kansas, and many fled before her ax.
    Carrie Amelia Moore was born on Nov. 25, 1846, in Garrard County, Ky., and married Dr. Charles Gloyd in 1867. Dr. Gloyd, a veteran of the Civil War was a drunkard, and died soon after their marriage.
    Ten years later, in 1877, she again tied the knot – this time with David Nation, a lawyer, minister and editor. In 1889, the couple moved to Medicine Lodge, Kan.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: This woman, born and reared in the Ramsey area, has six children (four daughters and two sons). She loves to bake and clean. She adores angels of many sizes.
    Do you know her? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo was: Bill Morton.
    Identifying him were: Mary Cripe, Donna Taylor, Esther Stine, and Phillip and Phyllis Richards.
    This week’s Scrambler:  kamsiset rea a caft fo feli. ti si het spornees ot eth orrre tath snoctu.