.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • McDowell competes in world auctioneer contest

    Among the 33 best auctioneers in the world gathered in Oklahoma City, Okla., this past June for the World Livestock Championship was Andrew McDowell, son of Mulberry Grove auctioneer, Alva R. McDowell, and his wife, Linda.
    Described as “the toughest, most prestigious contest of its kind in the world,” this was not Andrew’s first world championship.

  • The Way We Were-Sept. 9, 2010

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – The Old Settlers Social, an event which featured an old-fashioned ham and beans dinner, music and a performance by the 175th Celebration Dancers, raised about $4,000 for the restoration of the old Presbyterian Church in Vandalia.
    Karen Chaplin, a native of California, was sworn in as the new postmaster at the Brownstown Post Office.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bob Timmons were planning to celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary.

  • Thanks to FAYCO for taking on recycling project

    Editor:
    I think it's wonderful that FAYCO is taking on recycling,  and offering it on an almost daily basis.
    Prior to this effort, the Fayette County Soil and Water Conservation District offered this service one Saturday a month. There were always cars wrapped around the block. However, people waited patiently to contribute their recyclables to keep them out of the landfill.

  • Trammel terrorized area with Clingmans

    The story of Joe Trammel is one I have visited before in this column. Along with George Welsh and Jefferson Hastings, he was charged with the murder of an Oconee farmer by the name of Morris.
    Robbery was the motive, but a little killing didn’t seem to upset Joe Trammel, as he fired through a window, shooting John Morris in the head as he sat "at table."
    Truths retained in the old family stories handed down from generation to generation never cease to amaze me. Finding supporting facts that bear out these stories is something else.

  • Support co-op's rummage sale this Saturday

    It promises to be hog heaven for rummage sale fans.
    This Saturday's rummage sale, which will line several blocks of Gallatin Street with treasures of all descriptions, will feature dozens of vendors – all within easy walking distance.

  • Elijah Lovejoy martyred for freedom of press

    Elijah Parrish Lovejoy was born in Albion, Maine, in 1802, and died at the hands of an angry mob in Alton on Nov. 7, 1837.
    An editor and Presbyterian clergyman, Lovejoy was outspoken on the subject of slavery. He preached abolition through the pulpit and through the pages of the newspapers he edited.
    Elijah received his license to preach in 1832, and was ordained as an evangelist two years later. At this time, it was fairly new doctrine to condemn slavery, along with whiskey drinking and gambling.

  • Harvest safety is no accident

    Though it seems too early to talk about harvest, the reality is that much of this year’s corn crop is ready and some farmers are already heading to the fields.
    That means it’s time to renew our awareness of safety practices during the harvest season – both in the fields and on the roads.
    The Illinois State Police this week issued a reminder to motorists that they’ll once again be sharing the roadways with farm machinery.

  • The Way We Were-Sept. 2, 2010

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – Historical Vandalia Inc., the operator of the Fayette County Museum, started selling engraved bricks, which will be placed in walkways around the museum.
    According to an Illinois State Police report, crime was down in Fayette County in 1994. The total crime was 257, down from 314 in 1993.
    Gene and Marette Durbin of Ramsey were planning to celebrate their golden anniversary, and Robert and Eileen Osborne of Vandalia were to celebrate their 25th anniversary.