Today's Opinions

  • Article describes Vandalia's second capitol

    The first capitol in Vandalia was a frame two-story building erected on the northwest corner of Fifth and Johnson streets – at the current site of The Leader-Union.  Construction began in the spring of 1820, and records show it was built at a cost of around $4,000.
    A fire, discovered around 2 a.m. on the morning of Dec. 9, 1823, totally destroyed the building, along with some state papers.

  • Take precautions with severe heat

    This week has been another scorcher, with searing sunlight and temperatures in the triple digits. It’s the kind of weather that can get you in trouble before you know it.
    Even the nights haven’t offered much relief, often barely falling below 80 degrees.
    This uncomfortable weather pattern has lingered over the Midwest for the past several weeks. Yet, just because that kind of heat and humidity has become the norm, it hasn’t lost any of its dangerous potential.

  • Losing job is devastating

    I am writing this letter in response to the city of Vandalia wanting to give the mayor a raise, and doing away with the treasurer’s job.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These two young ladies, pictured in the mid-1950s, were attending 4-H camp at Allerton State Park.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – Vandalia’s first city administrator, Ron Neibert, had begun work at Vandalia City Hall.
    Former Vandalia residents, Winifred and Dennis Smith,  were celebrating their 65th wedding anniversary.
    Members of the Vandalia Historical Society approved the incorporation of the group, a step that became necessary after local historian, Mary Burtschi, announced her wish to donate the Little Brick House to the society.

  • Coles paid the price for anti-slavery stance

     Edward Coles has been ranked along with Abraham Lincoln as one of Illinois’ greatest citizens. It has been said of Coles, who was Illinois’ second governor (1822-1826), that he was a “victim of his own integrity.” Read on to see why.

  • Decision on treasurer's post made quickly

    Whether the city of Vandalia should switch the city treasurer from an elected position to an appointed one can be debated. One factor fueling that debate was the pace at which that action was taken.
    It was less than a month ago that the Vandalia City Council’s personnel, finance and insurance committee held its first meeting about  possible pay increases for the city officials to be elected next spring – mayor, city clerk, city treasurer and four aldermen.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – Between 450 and 500 people attended the open house for the new emergency room addition at Fayette County Hospital.
    Representatives of GEM (Going the Extra Mile) went to Springfield to receive a Governor's Home Town Award for volunteerism. GEM is the volunteer arm of the Fayette County Health Department.
    Deborah Philpot resigned from the superintendent's position in the Ramsey School District to take an associate dean position with Lake Land College.