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Today's Opinions

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – The city of Vandalia held a reception to welcome its first city administrator, Ron Niebert. The reception gave residents a chance to meet Neibert and his family.
    The Illinois legislature approved a new law dropping the legal intoxication limit for drivers from 1.0 to 0.8.
    The country band BR5-49 was the main attraction at the Fayette County Fair in Brownstown.

    20 Years Ago

  • Ramsey still has a Lustron home

    Considered an icon of the post-World War II conception of the American Dream, the Lustron home has its place on the National Register.

  • Recycling program is moving forward

    Fayette County’s baby steps toward having a legitimate recycling program recently received a major boost when FAYCO Enterprises recently announced its plans to purchase a building that will add significant credibility – and a lot of space – to its recycling effort.
    Officials with the sheltered workshop for mentally handicapped individuals have purchased a vacant 14,000-square-foot manufacturing building on Vandalia’s north side and plan to greatly expand the recycling program.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These friends, pictured in the early 1950s at a 4-H camp in Monticello, all grew up in the Loogootee area. The one on the left now lives in Springfield, the rest still live in the area.  

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 –  A month after convicted murderer Stuart Heaton had his petition for a new trial denied, his attorney argued that a ruling on his request for new DNA testing should be granted.
    Kelly McGinnis, a Greenville man charged with shooting up the office of Vandalia attorney Larry LeFevre, argued that because he will be in shackles for his trial, so should Fayette County State’s Attorney James Overholt.

  • Letter to the Editor

    Editor:
    I would like to clarify something that was published in the July 19 issue of The Leader-Union.
    Under the "Our Opinion" section, the last paragraph stated the following: "...but the fact that this was acted on so quickly after discussions began, after one public meeting on the issue, one is left to wonder if, and how, this was all studied and how all city officials, except the current treasurer, came to believe this was the right decision."
    This is not an accurate statement.

  • Article describes Vandalia's second capitol

    The first capitol in Vandalia was a frame two-story building erected on the northwest corner of Fifth and Johnson streets – at the current site of The Leader-Union.  Construction began in the spring of 1820, and records show it was built at a cost of around $4,000.
    A fire, discovered around 2 a.m. on the morning of Dec. 9, 1823, totally destroyed the building, along with some state papers.

  • Take precautions with severe heat

    This week has been another scorcher, with searing sunlight and temperatures in the triple digits. It’s the kind of weather that can get you in trouble before you know it.
    Even the nights haven’t offered much relief, often barely falling below 80 degrees.
    This uncomfortable weather pattern has lingered over the Midwest for the past several weeks. Yet, just because that kind of heat and humidity has become the norm, it hasn’t lost any of its dangerous potential.