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Today's Opinions

  • The Way We Were-June 16, 2011

    15 Years Ago

    1996 – The city of Vandalia received 38 applications for the position of community development director.
    Stewart and Verble Meador were planning to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary.
    Lucas Clanton, a rural Mulberry Grove resident and member of the Vandalia chapter of Future Farmers of America was named a Star American Farmer candidate.

    20 Years Ago

  • Cox Massacre program yields new facts

    Last week in this space, I told of the upcoming commemoration of the Cox Massacre, the first Indian attack ever recorded in Bond County. My story of the attack combined several sources, and this past Saturday, I learned even more after attending the Hill’s Fort Living History Days in Greenville.

  • City must seek new efficiencies

    After months of budget reviews and line-item trimming, the Vandalia City Council last week voted to balance the city’s budget by making personnel cuts.

  • Banks of the Okaw-June 9, 2011

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These two guys are cousins.

  • The Way We Were-June 9, 2011

    15 Years Ago

    1996 – Jeff and Jennifer Hester of Vandalia were celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary. The Rev. Reinhold and Mary Dierks were also celebrating their silver anniversary.
    Albert and Violet Johnstone of rural Mulberry Grove were celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary.
    Fayette County Sheriff Michael D. Kleinik gave support for a new juvenile detention center in Southern Illinois.

  • Motorcycles are too loud; need mufflers

    Editor:
    Recently, I read in your paper that the mayor proclaimed May to be motorcycle month.
    I would far rather that the mayor had proclaimed May to be “Put a muffler on that motorcycle" month.
    Loren Frakes Jr.
    Vandalia
     

  • Prophets try to profit from 'prophecies'

    Editor:
    I commend the Rev. Kurt Simon’s column in the “Minister’s Forum” in the June 2 edition of The Leader-Union concerning end-of-the-world prophecies.
    His commentary was accurate for those who read the Bible literally, and convincing for those who read the Bible metaphorically. Simon also had the courage to expose the so-called television prophets, who profit from their “prophecies,” while spreading fear and anxiety.

  • Massacre to be remembered

    Early in 1811, the Indians still made annual visits to Fayette and Bond counties for hunting.