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Today's Opinions

  • Support co-op's rummage sale this Saturday

    It promises to be hog heaven for rummage sale fans.
    This Saturday's rummage sale, which will line several blocks of Gallatin Street with treasures of all descriptions, will feature dozens of vendors – all within easy walking distance.

  • Elijah Lovejoy martyred for freedom of press

    Elijah Parrish Lovejoy was born in Albion, Maine, in 1802, and died at the hands of an angry mob in Alton on Nov. 7, 1837.
    An editor and Presbyterian clergyman, Lovejoy was outspoken on the subject of slavery. He preached abolition through the pulpit and through the pages of the newspapers he edited.
    Elijah received his license to preach in 1832, and was ordained as an evangelist two years later. At this time, it was fairly new doctrine to condemn slavery, along with whiskey drinking and gambling.

  • Harvest safety is no accident

    Though it seems too early to talk about harvest, the reality is that much of this year’s corn crop is ready and some farmers are already heading to the fields.
    That means it’s time to renew our awareness of safety practices during the harvest season – both in the fields and on the roads.
    The Illinois State Police this week issued a reminder to motorists that they’ll once again be sharing the roadways with farm machinery.

  • The Way We Were-Sept. 2, 2010

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – Historical Vandalia Inc., the operator of the Fayette County Museum, started selling engraved bricks, which will be placed in walkways around the museum.
    According to an Illinois State Police report, crime was down in Fayette County in 1994. The total crime was 257, down from 314 in 1993.
    Gene and Marette Durbin of Ramsey were planning to celebrate their golden anniversary, and Robert and Eileen Osborne of Vandalia were to celebrate their 25th anniversary.

  • Banks of the Okaw-Sept. 2, 2010

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: This young woman, pictured more than 50 years ago, grew up east of Vandalia. She was the owner of a downtown Vandalia business for several years. She recently celebrated a special birthday.
    Do you know her? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo were: No photo last week. More photos are needed.
    This week’s Scrambler:  eht amn how swive het dwolr ta tyfif eth mesa yaw eh idd ta tynewt sha dawtse tyriht sraye fo feli.

  • The Way We Were-Aug. 26, 2010

    15 Years Ago

    1995 – The Illinois Historic Preservation Agency gave Historical Vandalia Inc. $50,000 to use toward the restoration of the old Presbyterian Church, which houses the Fayette County Museum and Artworks Gallery.
    Vandalia School District officials and the Vandalia Unit Teachers Association agreed to a two-year extension on the contract for district teachers. The extension gave teachers a pay increase of 5 percent in each of the two years.
    Floyd and Lucille Bingaman of Brownstown were planning to celebrate their 65th anniversary.

  • Banks of the Okaw-Aug. 26

    No Mystery Banks Photo this week. (We need photos. If you have old photos that are at least 20 years old and are of people who are still living, bring them in.)
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo were: Marcia Curry Haslett, Deborah Curry Merrill and Tom Curry.
    Identifying them were: Dick and Joyce Paul, and Maxine Crager.
    This week’s Scrambler: meit si a targe hatrece, tub tralfunyounte ti slilk lal sti plipsu.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.

  • Schools are in session; use extra caution

    In case you haven’t noticed the increased morning and afternoon traffic around area schools, we’ll give you a gentle reminder that school is now in session.
    For those of us whose daily route takes us past a school, that means we must pay closer attention to students on their way to or from school. Whether they’re elementary school students who are prone to dash into the street or teens who are preoccupied with their cell phones as they walk or drive, school zones can be dangerous areas.