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Editorials

  • We all can help in cancer fight

    You may have noticed something different about today’s Leader-Union. Yes, two pages are printed on pink paper.
    We invested in that attention-grabbing paper because we’re observing breast cancer awareness month. And on that paper, we’ve printed a profile of Elloise Black, articles about breast cancer and advertising messages from caring local businesses to bring more attention to defeating this deadly disease.

  • Help prevent West Nile

    Though it seems too late in the year to be concerned about mosquito-borne illnesses, the reality is that insects infected with the West Nile Virus were detected in St. Elmo within the past couple weeks.
    That means it’s prudent to take precautions to prevent exposure to the disease.

  • Support musicial activities as well

    Each week, we devote several pages of The Leader-Union to covering the achievements of hundreds of our young people who are involved in sports of one sort or another. Those participants include preschoolers to adults, and the sports include (this time of year) football, baseball, volleyball, tennis, soccer and cross country. Also a part of the sports pages are stock car racing and its small-scale cousin, radio-controlled car racing.

  • Plan to attend Grande Levée, Harvest Festival

    If you’re looking for something fun to do for the weekend, look no further than downtown Vandalia. The activities begin Friday evening and run throughout the day Saturday.
    The annual Grande Levée celebration at the Vandalia Statehouse will have its usual lineup of period activities that would’ve been part of such an event during the era when Vandalia served as the capital of the emerging state of Illinois in the 1820s and 1830s.

  • Share the roads with our farmers

    They’ve had more than enough time to prepare their equipment for this year’s harvest. And now, after a late season brought on by persistent spring rains and a cool summer, the corn crop is nearly ready.
    As a result, we can expect to see area farmers heading to the fields in great numbers in the next few days.
    That means two things:

  • Sidewalk project is a good start

    If you’ve walked much in the Vandalia city limits, you’re aware of the dire condition of some of the city’s sidewalks. Some are deteriorating. Some are being heaved up by tree roots. And some are non-existent.
    The city of Vandalia is currently seeking bids for the replacement of sections of sidewalks in nine specific locations within the city. (See the Legal Notice on page 10 of today’s Leader-Union for full information.)

  • Youth Court may offer alternative

    When Fayette County youths run afoul of the law, they soon may find themselves at the mercy of their peers.
    Though it’s a different method of meting out justice, a new structure called Youth Court offers an alternative that just might work.

  • King's dream must become our dream

    Fifty years ago this week, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered one of the most memorable speeches of our generation.
    His “I Have A Dream” speech in Washington, D.C., crystallized the growing unrest and impatience among black citizens, but his soaring rhetoric that day also painted a vision for the rest of the nation of what needed to happen to bring equal opportunity to all Americans.

  • School's open – drive carefully, get involved

    School’s in session!
    As area students and teachers returned to the classroom this week, the beginning of another school year affects more than their daily schedules. It impacts the entire community.
    First and foremost, we urge motorists to use extreme caution around schools and other high-traffic intersections in town. Students on their way to and from school have many things on their minds, and safely sharing the road with motorists is frequently not on the top of the list. Be extra vigilant, particularly in the hour before school and after school.

  • Voluntary cleanup better than rules

    The Fayette County Board asked for input on a proposed solid waste ordinance. At Tuesday’s public hearing, it got an earful!
    The hearing attracted nearly 200 people, and virtually no one had anything good to say about the ordinance – the stated purpose of which is to protect citizens from nuisances deemed “potentially injurious to public safety, health and welfare.”