• Small-town benefits shine during holidays

    This time of year, we’re reminded of why we love living in a small community.
    There are parades, church programs, school performances, community events and, of course, the general hustle and bustle of holiday shopping.
    The beauty of those events in a small town is that we know many of the people involved. We see our friends and neighbors at the events. And we marvel at the talents displayed our young people at the band and choral concerts.

  • Share with others at Christmas time

    It is, as the Christmas carol says, “beginning to look a lot like Christmas.” With the Thanksgiving activities barely behind us, the list of Christmas events in the area is already jam-packed. And that’s a good thing.
    For a full rundown of the events planned in Fayette County, see the story on page 1 of today’s Leader-Union. It includes a variety of holiday activities, numerous appearances by Santa and several holiday performances by students at area schools. Get those events on your calendar, and show your support by attending.

  • Happy Thanksgiving!

    Each year, Thanksgiving offers us a choice. Do we truly give thanks? Or do we simply go through the holiday motions?
    It’s easy to put things on autopilot – gathering with family, gorging ourselves on holiday goodies and lounging in front of endless football games?
    But does that really move us in directions that this uniquely American holiday should? Do we ever consider those things for which we should be deeply thankful? If not, how can we move ourselves in that direction?

  • Adermann deserving of thanks for 37 years with VVFD

    You know how on some mornings, it’s tough to roll out of bed and get ready for work? Imagine being awakened in the middle of the night, jumping out of bed, and getting dressed and ready to work in a matter of minutes.
    Then, doing that time and time again, even in the dead of winter, for 37 years.
    That’s the life that Merle Adermann led as a member of the Vandalia Volunteer Fire Department, with his last 19 years of service to the community being as the chief of the department.

  • This Friday, say thanks to a vet

    For nearly a century, Americans have paused on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month to honor and thank the nation’s military personnel for their sacrifices to preserve our freedom.
    Friday is that day.
    We join with citizens all across the United States in saying thanks to our veterans. Their unselfish service to our country – in times of conflict as well as peace – has kept our military presence strong and our nation free.

  • Halloween shows city's sidewalk shortcomings

    Vandalia has a sidewalk problem.
    Though it’s an issue that’s been noted by city officials before, driving around on Halloween night underscored the dangerous conditions to which our pedestrians are subjected.
    Young trick-or-treaters swarmed in the streets all along Locust Street and up Shelley Drive. And even though the trunk-or-treat event in the parking lot of Sunset Plaza was off the road, parking and pedestrian traffic on Sunset made it truly scary to drive through that area.

  • Keep kids safe this Halloween

    There will be a lot of scary little creatures roaming around in the coming days. What’s even scarier is the thought of one of those creatures being injured in an accident.
    Halloween is just around the corner, and it’s being celebrated with a variety of activities, including trick-or-treating.

  • County must not eat its seed corn

    For the past several meetings of the Fayette County Board, Chairman Steve Knebel has pleaded with county department heads to trim their budgets.
    He’s warned them of the dire financial straits the county is in. He’s told him that layoffs will be necessary if significant cuts aren’t made. And he’s cautioned them against continued dependence on the county’s capital improvement fund to cover operating expenses.
    It’s time for action. If not, we'll continue to eat our seed corn.

  • Public Notices inform citizens

    Though today’s issue of The Leader-Union contains an unusual volume of Public Notices, those notices are a valuable part of each and every issue of the paper.

  • Information on suicide given at school program

    Suicide. Few other topics leave us with more questions and fewer answers.
    It’s a problem that isn’t discussed enough to allow us to understand the causes, let alone give us tools to help prevent those around us from seeing it as a way out when the going gets tough.
    Dr. Elizabeth Laden-Gross hopes to change all that.
    A volunteer with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Laden-Gross will be addressing students, teachers and community residents in Farina and Vandalia next week.