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Columns

  • The story of Little Hickory Church

    In the past few years, it seems more people have asked me about Little Hickory Church in North Hurricane Township than any other church in the county.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    There is no photo this week.
    Last week's photo: Ken Cripe.
    Identifying him were: Carol Behrends, Robert and Esther Meyer, Roger and Betty Roe, Patti West, Rube Yarbrough, Boyd and Norma Ledbetter, Donna Chrisman, Steve Merriman, Lisa and Davis Schaal, Brad and Connie Brannon, and Beth and Steve Tarter.
    This week’s Scrambler: etagr teuporistnpio rea eotnf neligtfe.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: Remember that credit is money.

  • Fayette County's early ties to Texas

    Texas was an independent nation from March 2, 1836-Feb. 16, 1846 when it became the 28th state to join the Union.
    Sam Houston was chosen president of the republic, with his inauguration on Oct. 22, 1836. Annexation to the United States was applied for and, as they say, the rest is history.
    Let’s go back a few years, shall we – before 1836? There is a Fayette County connection there.

  • Vandalia Memories
  • Fayette County's early ties to Texas

    Texas was an independent nation from March 2, 1836-Feb. 16, 1846 when it became the 28th state to join the Union.
    Sam Houston was chosen president of the republic, with his inauguration on Oct. 22, 1836. Annexation to the United States was applied for and, as they say, the rest is history.
    Let’s go back a few years, shall we – before 1836? There is a Fayette County connection there.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week's photo: This young man, in a photo taken on his wedding day in the late 1970s, is involved in farming and commercial agriculture.

  • Vandalia Memories
  • Lincoln's friendship with a woman

    Abraham Lincoln formed many lasting friendships during his five years in Vandalia. One of these was with Orville Hickman Browning and his wife, Eliza, from Quincy.

  • Vandalia Memories
  • Behind the scenes at the White House

    One of the books that I’ve had on my bookshelf for several decades is “My Thirty Years Backstairs at the White House,” by Lillian Rogers Parks, published in 1961.  
    I pull it down every 10 years or so and reacquaint myself with the interesting story captured between the covers, for not only was Lillian a maid and seamstress at the White House for 50 years, her mother, Maggie, had started under the Taft administration and served for 30 years.