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Columns

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: Photos are needed. Please submit one.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo were: No picture lastt week.
    This week’s Scrambler: neo flah fo wonknig thwa oyu natw si gikwonn hawt uoy stum vegi pu fobree uyo egt ti.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.

  • Judge Henry shares early Vandalia memories

    In 1914, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of The Vandalia Union newspaper, the editor asked old settlers to write down their remembrances of Vandalia and submit them to the newspaper for publication in a special issue.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – Kelly McGinnis, a 41-year-old man who earlier this year was convicted of murdering Greenville attorney Tom Meyer, was sentenced to 10 years in prison after being convicted of armed violence in Fayette County. McGinnis was found guilty of shooting up the office of Vandalia attorney Larry LeFevre.
    Travis Blain passed the 1,000-yard mark in rushing for the second straight season as the Vandalia Vandals defeated Hillsboro, 31-8.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: No photo this week.
    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo were: No photo last week.
    This week’s Scrambler:  rehte era heter stendiregin ni eth dogo feli: ginlaren, nagnire nad rignaney.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: Too many people overvalue what they are not and undervalue what they are. (Malcolm Forbes)

  • 'Vandalia Raid' part of Civil War history

    Alenia Dressor McCord was reared in the Bethel community, now Reno, about eight miles northwest of Greenville and was a child during the turbulent years of the Civil War.
    She told her granddaughter, the late Alenia McCord, many family stories. Miss McCord is remembered by many as a teacher at Vandalia High School. One of her stories was about an event that would become known as the "Vandalia Raid."

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Scrambler:  oot nyma loepep luvareevo thwa yeht era ont nad vernudaule twah ehyt rae.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: The four cornerstones of character on which this nation is built are: initiative, imagination, individuality and independence.

  • When is a hit more than a hit?

    It’s every parent’s nightmare.
    Your son is playing football, takes a thunderous hit to the head and goes face down on the turf. He doesn’t move.
    Time stands still. Your vision swirls. You rush to the field. Your protective instincts are running full-throttle.

  • Breast cancer journey continues

    It has been 13 years now since I was told that I had breast cancer – a fast-growing type, they said. On a scale from two to nine, I was a seven. Not a good number to be.
    Being the first in my immediate family to be diagnosed with cancer, I searched my ancestor charts for other kin who may have died as a result of this particular affliction. I came up blank. In fact, throughout the lives of my family members, the most common cause of death was old age.

  • Vandalia crucial to Illinois railroad history

    Editor Thomas Lakin of The Vandalia Union newspaper once wrote, “Vandalia is the cradle in which the infant Illinois was rocked.”

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – It was the one-year anniversary of the work camp at Vandalia Correctional Center. Inmate hours at the work camp were totaling as many as 30,000 per month.
    Brownstown officials were celebrating the startup of a sewer line replacement project. A $350,000 state grant was being used in conjunction with a $150,000 loan.
    Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hoffmire were celebrating their 30th wedding anniversary.
    Sophia Martin was celebrating her 100th birthday at Fayette County Hospital & Long Term Care.