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Columns

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These two boys are cousins who were born one day apart.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: These two girls grew up in the Pittsburg area.

  • The Way We Were

    15 Years Ago

    1997 – The Vandalia Chamber of Commerce’s community improvement committee, headed by Jean Stombaugh, arranged to have Vandalia participate in a Community Swap with Tuscola. The University of Illinois Extension Program’s Community Swap program allows people to visit and assess each other’s community.
    Fayette County Supervisor of Assessments Cindi Lotz announced that she would seek a second term in office.

  • Adoption info searches not often fruitful

    I was 8 or 9 years old when my brother, Don, told me that I was adopted.
    The evidence was irrefutable: I was the only child in the family to have freckles, I was the only one (of six) who had to wear glasses at an early age and I didn’t have a baby book.
    I would say the absence of the baby book was the main proof of my birth outside the family. Also, Mom couldn’t put her hands on my birth certificate.
    When one adds up all the "facts," there are several good reasons why I believed what my older brother had told me.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    In last week’s Mystery Banks Photo were: No photo last week. Old photos are needed for the Banks of the Okaw feature.
    This week’s Scrambler:  rehet era nyma grisbed ot a rebett feli. genlokdew snaphep ot eb eht somt lirbalee.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: We do experience moments absolutely free from worry. These brief respites are called panic.

  • Death of L-U staffer leaves void in plant

    They don’t make ’em like him anymore.

  • Mahon fought in Revolutionary War

    Thomas Mahon did not come to Fayette County until he was quite up in years. At age 76, he cut his ties with old Virginia and settled his family on the Illinois prairie of Wheatland Township.

  • Letter preserves history of Grandfields

    With the building of the National Road through Fayette County, beginning around 1829, workmen and their families arrived and villages grew along the route, with Howard’s Point being a prime example.
    One of these was that of Thomas Grandfield. Through a letter written in 1957 by Lewis Grandfield to a grandson, we learn that Thomas was a stone cutter, and worked his way from Philadelphia to Fayette County on the National Road.

  • Banks of the Okaw

    This week’s Mystery Banks Photo: No photo this week. Old photos are needed.
    This week’s Scrambler: ew od creepenexi stemnom tybulesalo erfe morf ryrow. stehe firbe pirestse rae lacdel cinpa.
    Can you unscramble it? If so, call The Leader-Union, 283-3374, by 5 p.m. next Monday.
    Last week’s Scrambler: The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor. (Vince Lombardi)

  • Sarver's book recalls rural life in 1914-15

    Recently I have been reading a book written by Jess Sarver, titled, “As It Comes To Mind.” Initially published in 1976 by The Pana News-Palladium of Pana, a second printing was done in 1980. My copy is from the second run.
    This little book centers on Jess’s home in Carson Township, and the family, neighbors and friends who were all a part of his life while growing up.