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Today's News

  • Two arrested for murder of former St. Elmo man

    Investigators of the Major Case Squad have confirmed the identity of the dismembered and burned body that was discovered in East St. Louis early Tuesday morning.

    The victim has been identified through this investigation and confirmed by dental records as 22-year-old Zachary Irvin, who recently relocated to St. Louis from St. Elmo. 

    Two suspects, 41-year-old Dennis M. Iagulli and 35-year-old James E. Pierson, are in custody and have been charged by the St. Clair County State’s Attorney’s Office.

  • Post 95 late rally falls short

    The Senior Legion team couldn't beat an early deficit or holes in its roster to top Centralia on Tuesday. Post 95 fell 8-6.

    "The guys we had battled," coach Steve Hosick said.

    A couple of missing players on Tuesday night forced Hosick to put some players out of position on defense and put Andy Hosick, who has a fractured left wrist, on the mound.

  • Severe storm hits Vandalia

    A severe storm that moved through Vandalia early Sunday evening damaged numerous trees and left many of Vandalia's streets flooded.

    Local authorities were assessing the damage on Monday morning.

    Photos of some of the damage are shown here.

     

  • Do you have storm photos?

    Do you have photos from Sunday's storm which show damage or flooding that you'd like to share?

    We'd like to help you share those photos both in this week's issue and online at our web site.

    You may drop photos off at our office, bring in your digital camera or e-mail photos to rbauer@leaderunion.com.

     

  • 12:45 p.m.-Monday-City will seek state, federal assistance

    The city of Vandalia will seek financial assistance from the state and federal governments as a result of Sunday's storm.

    City officials met with Fayette County Emergency Management Agency Coordinator Steve Koehler mid-morning on Monday to begin the process of applying for assistance.

    The process involves gathering information from both the city and property owners who sustained damage. Those with damage are asked to stop by city hall or call 283-1196.

  • Timing of events may hurt success

    You know the old saying about not really appreciating something until you lose it. That saying applies to the Grande Levée.

    The period celebration returned, albeit in a downscaled version, to the Vandalia Statehouse grounds this past weekend, and it was, for the most part, very well received.

    Friday night’s attendance lagged behind that of past years, and, on Saturday, the crowd began to fade by mid-afternoon. That, we believe, was largely due to the high heat and humidity.

  • Use of maiden name confounds historians

    One day while quizzing my dad about the family, he made a comment that has stuck with me over the years: “My grandmother was raised in the home of C.F.W. Walther.”  

    He went on to say that her mother worked as a housekeeper for the Walther family in St. Louis, and this is why his grandmother, Emelia Rau Torbeck, spent several years of her childhood in their home.  

  • Thomason's slander suit dismissed

    A judge said on Wednesday that if St. Elmo’s former police chief wishes to sue that town’s mayor for slander, he needs to be more specific.

    In a short hearing in Fayette County Circuit Court, Judge S. Gene Schwarm dismissed Ken Thomason’s lawsuit against Larry Tish, but gave Thomason three weeks to file an amended complaint.

  • City workers adjust schedule due to heat

    Many of us avoid the heat and high humidity at our jobs by working in air-conditioned buildings. Vandalia’s public works employees are not so lucky.

    Alderman Bret Brosman, chairman of the city council’s streets committee, reported at Monday’s council meeting that Public Works Director John Moyer has adjusted his employees’ work schedule because of the hot weather.

    Moyer said on Wednesday that on days where high temperatures are predicted, his crews are working from 5 a.m. until noon or 12:30 p.m.

  • Haldon Warner retires after 47 years at First National Bank

    Haldon Warner became a member of the family at First National Bank of Vandalia in 1963, working in the bookkeeping department.

    “Back then,” he said, “they wanted you to start by learning every department and work your way up.”

    That seems like a good plan, because young Haldon Warner did, indeed, work his way up. He is now senior vice president and chief lending officer, positions from which he is retiring. He wears other hats, including serving as the compliance officer.