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Today's News

  • Brownstown District will honor retirees

    The Brownstown Board of Education will honor these school district retirees at a luncheon on Tuesday, May 31.

    Together, these five employees have 163 years in public education. From left to right are: Harlan Beckel, high school math, 33 yearts; Mary Nelle Douglas, junior-senior high librarian, 27 years; Susan Smith, elementary eduction, 35 years; Diane Curll, high school English and speech, 35 years; and Doug Slover, superintendent, 33 years.

  • VCHS crowns prom royalty

    John Vosholler and Micah Dugan (first photo) were crowned king and queen at the Vandalia Community High School prom on Saturday night.

    The prom court is shown in the second photo. From left to right are Justin Rubin, Aubrey Edwards, Tyler Westendorf (standing in for retiring king Tyler Vosholler), retiring queen Katie Vieregge, queen Micah Dugan, king John Vosholler, Casey Warner, Daniel Bell, Emily Hill and Jeremy Leininger.

  • Brownstown-Sefton News

    Special Day Brings Back Special Memories
    Mother’s Day – Does growing up with this special day tend to cause us to take it for granted?
    If so, let’s take some time to remember some of the things our mothers did for us, and we will probably realize just how special they were…or if you are fortunate, is.
    Shirley (Sperry) Curry remembers her mother (Ellen Sperry) meeting her and her siblings when they came home from school every day.

  • Frogtown News

    Visit Family in Michigan
    Larry and Sue Urban of St. Peter traveled to Reed City, Mich., for a visit with daughter and son-in-law, Keri and Tom Latin, and attended the Operetta of Emma & Elijah Latin on Friday, April 29. The Operetta was entitled, “A Man Named Noah.”
    The twins were decked out in penguin costumes, handmade by their adopted Michigan grandmas. An enjoyable and relaxing time was spent with the Latins on Saturday enjoying the great Michigan outdoors.

  • St. Elmo News

    ANNOUNCEMENTS
    Wednesday, May 4
    • Wright’s Corner Unit of Home and Community Education, 1 p.m., Loudon Town House.

  • Old Capitol View will open Thursday

    Old Capital View Restaurant & Lounge, located at 401 W. Gallatin St. in Vandalia, will officially open its doors for business at 11 a.m. this Thursday.
    The  business’s specialty is “homemade everything.” They will feature a lunch buffet and a complete menu with entrée choices featuring beef, pork, chicken, pasta and seafood, as well as fresh salads, sandwiches and a complete line of desserts.

  • Wet soils impact anhydrous application

    Wet soil conditions are causing concern for anhydrous ammonia application this spring, said Fabian Fernandez, University of Illinois Extension specialist in soil fertility and plant nutrition.
    Anhydrous ammonia is the most widely used nitrogen fertilizer source in Illinois. In order for this fertilizer to be effective, good soil moisture conditions are necessary, Fernandez said.
    Ideal soil conditions are about 15-20 percent moisture. Within these moisture levels, a fine-textured soil, such as silty clay loam, feels slightly moist.

  • Planting delays prompt changes

     As the planting delay lengthens, many farmers are wondering if they should switch crops from corn to soybeans, and if they should change corn hybrids from earlier to later ones.
    “We’re ahead of the rest of the Corn Belt, but with only about 10 percent planted in April, it’s a disappointing start after the dry weather in early April,” said Emerson Nafziger, University of Illinois Extension agronomist.

  • Wet weather stalls planting

    For the second week in a row, cool temperatures, moist conditions and heavy rains have kept seeding and other field activities on hold across the state.
    A few areas were able to get out into the field on Sunday evening. The statewide average temperature was 1.2 degrees below normal, at 55.4 degrees.
    Average precipitation for the state was 2.34 inches. The norm for the time period is 0.9 inches. Saturated fields and flooding have been a problem at some locations, especially along the Illinois and Mississippi rivers.  

  • Cicadas ready to emerge after 13-year absence

    For the past 13 years, cicada nymphs have been underground, feeding on tree and shrub roots, but according to University of Illinois entomologist James Appleby, they will be emerging very soon, and when they do, you’ll know it because you’ll hear them singing.