Today's News

  • Vandalia's fight to keep Orgill continues

    Contrary to rumors that were circulating in the community late last week, Orgill Inc. has not yet determined where it will build a new distribution center.

    That means that Vandalia is still in the running for that center, which will measure about 700,000 square feet and employ up to 350 people.

    It also means that the company has not yet decided to close its distribution center on Veterans Avenue, which employs about 140 people.

  • UPDATE-Large crowd gathers for Orgill support photo

    UPDATE-Posted at 5 p.m. on Tuesday – A large crowd gathered on the lawn of the Orgill facility in Vandalia on Tuesday afternoon to show their support for a larger distribution center in Vandalia.

    The crowd gathered for a photo organized by a group of employees led by Justin Arndt.

    For more, see this week's issue of The Leader-Union.


    UPDATE: To show the community's support for Orgill, and the jobs that the company provides locally, the employees have organized a community photo at the facility at Veterans Avenue at 4 p.m. today (Tuesday).

  • City dealing with rail crossings, downtown parking

    Meeting for less than 30 minutes on Monday, city officials discussed things that can be done to address two traffic matters.

    First, it set a meeting to discuss the use of parking spaces along Gallatin Street in the downtown business district.

    Second, the mayor told how city residents can be a part of a campaign to help improve deteriorating railroad crossings in Vandalia.

  • Area Community Calendar

    Thursday, June 19

    eoe" Soroptimist International will meet at noon at Ponderosa Steakhouse in Vandalia.

    eoe" TOPS IL 1872, Ramsey, will meet at the Christian Church in Ramsey. Weigh-in is at 6 p.m., and the meeting is at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Tami Washburn at 283-4664.

    Friday, June 20

  • Jr. Legion off to 4-2 start

    Sporting a 4-2 record after one week of play, the Post 95 Junior American Legion baseball team is already having a better summer than it did a year ago - and the summer of 2008 has yet to officially begin.

    The trick now is keeping it up.

    "Some of the kids were talking about already having more wins than last year," said Post 95 coach Luke Hohlt Tuesday after Vandalia's 9-4 victory over visiting Centralia. "But we can't stop here. We've just got to keep rolling."

  • Freight sweep way to Kelso Klassic Title

    The Vandalia Guaranteed Air Freight fastpitch softball team is back - with a vengance.

    Coming off a second national title and an offseason of uncertainty regarding its future, the Freight showed it'll be a force to be reckoned with once again by sweeping its way to the title at the Kelso, Mo., Klassic over the weekend.

  • Sr. Legion loses heartbreaker to Taylorville

    Visiting Taylorville did absolutely everything it needed to do to get a win Tuesday.

    But that didn't make the Vandalia Post 95 Sr. American Legion baseball team's first loss of the young season any easier to swallow.

    Despite timely hitting, spectacular defense and stingy pitching by Taylorville throughout the first 8 1/2 innings, Post 95 had a golden opportunity to steal a win in the bottom of the ninth.

    The Cardinals had just scored two runs to cut a three-run Taylorville lead to just one, and had the bases loaded with nobody out.

  • Railroad must fix unsafe crossings

    Were told time and time again that railroad crossings can be hazardous. Thats particularly true in Vandalia.

    However, while oncoming trains certainly pose dangers at the local crossings, they are not the only hazard.

    As signs posted by residents of that area point out, the crossing at Remann Street near Main Street is in itself a hazard.

  • Guest Column-Illinois needs moratorium on prison closures

    It's time to quit playing with peoples lives with regard to prison closures, and end the political gamesmanship that surrounds prison site decisions. A bipartisan group of my colleagues in the General Assembly are advocating a comprehensive review of Illinois correctional facilities and programs.

  • Peter Hill wrote account of early settlers

    With the celebration of the 40th Grande Leve over the weekend, it seems that this is the proper place and time for Peter B. Hill to tell his story.

    His first-person account of the hardships in the early days of white habitation of the Illinois Territory was written in 1873, and gives us a first-person look at those days and times.

    Peter Bruns Hill was born April 14, 1808, in Kentucky, the youngest son of Henry and Elizabeth Bruns Hill. He was eight years old when his parents came to the territory.