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Today's News

  • City to require inspection of burned building

    Even after hearing three officials say they believe that a building gutted by fire last month should come down, the Vandalia City Council decided to have an expert look at the building before deciding that building's fate.

    Mayor Rick Gottman and the council agreed to require that Dennis Gerkin have a structural engineer inspect the former home of his State Farm agency within two weeks.

  • City asking Morani to help after his departure

    Jimmy Morani attended his final regular meeting of the Vandalia City Council as the city administrator on Monday, but he may be helping the city on some level after his departure in the middle of this month. 

  • All of Gallatin Street now open

     After the painting of traffic lanes and parking spaces was completed on Friday, the final block of the Gallatin Street improvement project was open to traffic.

    The work on Friday essentially marked the completion of the project about one year after work on the downtown business began and about two months ahead of schedule.

     

  • Downtown ordeal nearly over

    A little more than a year after workers dug up the first section of Gallatin Street, there’s light at the end of the tunnel or, more specifically, light at the east end of Vandalia’s downtown business district.

    The 400 block of Gallatin Street was opened to traffic on Tuesday afternoon, and city officials say the 300 block – the final block of the downtown enhancement project – could be opened up as early as Friday.

  • Check your smoke detectors!

    All of us can’t depend on someone like Larry Peyton driving by at the right time; therefore, we need to make sure that we have smoke detectors in our homes … and that they’re working.

    Peyton was driving by Washburn Trailer Court at Vandalia Lake early Saturday morning when he noticed smoke coming from one of the mobile homes. As the residents heard Peyton pounding on the door, they noticed that their smoke detector was beeping, giving them time to get outside safely.

  • Thomas Lakin writes memoir of his life

    In 1893, after living on a farm and teaching school for 38 years in Christian County, Thomas N. Lakin purchased The Vandalia Union newspaper. 

    His son, Ira, was only 18 years old when his father sent him to Vandalia, in March 1893, to take over publication of the weekly newspaper.

    Accompanying him in the move to Vandalia were his wife, Rebecca, sons, Jesse and Ira, and daughters, Lulu, Minnie and Ara. A third son, Will, stayed behind in Christian County, where he died in 1914.

  • Passerby, smoke detector allow couple to escape fire

    Thanks to a passing motorist and a smoke detector, a couple escaped from their burning residence Saturday morning.

    According to Vandalia Fire Chief Merle Adermann, Larry Peyton was driving past Washburn Trailer Court on Lakewood Drive at about 9 a.m. when he noticed smoke coming from one of the mobile homes.

  • 400 block of Gallatin open

    A little more than a year after the first piece of Gallatin Street was ripped up, and two months ahead of schedule, Vandalia’s downtown enhancement project is within days of completion.

    After looking over the work done in the 300 and 400 block of Gallatin Street with Mayor Rick Gottman and representatives of Hank’s Excavating and Landscaping of Belleville, the general contractor on the project, Illinois Department of Transportation officials told  the city shortly after noon on Tuesday that it could open the 400 block to traffic.

  • KC planning for growth at Vandalia Campus

    Just like everyone else, Kaskaskia College has been hurt by a sagging economy and the state’s failure to meet its financial obligations. But, KC’s president said on Tuesday, the college is through the tough times due to a savings-type fund established several years ago.

    In fact, Dr. James Underwood said at a community meeting held at the KC Vandalia Campus, the college is looking toward continued growth, both in facilities and programs.

  • Slowed by an accident, Elliott turns to his love for poetry

    A framed photograph in Roy Elliott’s room shows his shirt tail being cut off, a traditional ritual when someone becomes a licensed airplane pilot.

    A member of Fayette County Civil Defense (now Emergency Management Agency)  for years, he was a jack-of-all-trades with many skills, until a fateful day three years ago when a tree he was trimming fell on him, fracturing his back in two places. Parkinson’s disease entered the picture, rendering him unable to perform routine daily activities.