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Local News

  • Severe storm hits Vandalia

    A severe storm that moved through Vandalia early Sunday evening damaged numerous trees and left many of Vandalia's streets flooded.

    Local authorities were assessing the damage on Monday morning.

    Photos of some of the damage are shown here.

     

  • Do you have storm photos?

    Do you have photos from Sunday's storm which show damage or flooding that you'd like to share?

    We'd like to help you share those photos both in this week's issue and online at our web site.

    You may drop photos off at our office, bring in your digital camera or e-mail photos to rbauer@leaderunion.com.

     

  • 12:45 p.m.-Monday-City will seek state, federal assistance

    The city of Vandalia will seek financial assistance from the state and federal governments as a result of Sunday's storm.

    City officials met with Fayette County Emergency Management Agency Coordinator Steve Koehler mid-morning on Monday to begin the process of applying for assistance.

    The process involves gathering information from both the city and property owners who sustained damage. Those with damage are asked to stop by city hall or call 283-1196.

  • Thomason's slander suit dismissed

    A judge said on Wednesday that if St. Elmo’s former police chief wishes to sue that town’s mayor for slander, he needs to be more specific.

    In a short hearing in Fayette County Circuit Court, Judge S. Gene Schwarm dismissed Ken Thomason’s lawsuit against Larry Tish, but gave Thomason three weeks to file an amended complaint.

  • City workers adjust schedule due to heat

    Many of us avoid the heat and high humidity at our jobs by working in air-conditioned buildings. Vandalia’s public works employees are not so lucky.

    Alderman Bret Brosman, chairman of the city council’s streets committee, reported at Monday’s council meeting that Public Works Director John Moyer has adjusted his employees’ work schedule because of the hot weather.

    Moyer said on Wednesday that on days where high temperatures are predicted, his crews are working from 5 a.m. until noon or 12:30 p.m.

  • Grande Leve Schedule
  • Thomason files suit in federal court

    About four months after filing a lawsuit against St. Elmo’s mayor in Fayette County, Ken Thomason has initiated a federal suit against Larry Tish.

    In the three-count suit filed in the Southern District of U.S. District Court, Thomason claims that Tish violated his civil rights and also violated the state’s Whistleblower Act.

    Thomason has filed the lawsuits in response to Tish’s decision last November to remove him from the police chief position. He had served as St. Elmo’s chief of police for about 16 ½ years prior to his dismissal.

  • County meets payroll without fund transfer

    For at least one month, Fayette County will be able to meet its payroll obligations without having to shift monies from one fund to another.

    Fayette County Board Chairman Steve Knebel announced at last week’s meeting that the county would not need to transfer money from its capital improvement fund in June “because the state came through with some money.”

  • Removal of canvas reveals stenciled oilcloth at museum

    In addition to experiencing the annual art and photography exhibits at the Town & Country Amateur Art Show this weekend, visitors to the Fayette County Museum will also be able to view some rare history.

    Visitors to the show will be among the first to see the recently unveiled oilcloth ceiling in the historic church building that houses Artworks Gallery and the Fayette County Museum.

    That oilcloth design has been covered by white canvas for the past century, but now is available for residents to admire.

  • Recycling continues to be popular in Fayette County

    Since a recycling program was started last fall, the collection site has been changed several times. Area residents have stay attuned to those moves, continuing to show up in droves.

    Figures released this week by Karen Sanders of the Fayette County Soil and Water Conservation District show that the recycling program is well-accepted.

    Since the monthly collections were started last September, Sanders said, 24 tons of paper, plastic, cardboard, newspaper, magazines, aluminum and tin have been collected.