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Farm

  • Heritage Days at Greenville Farm Museum
  • Historical ag statistics now available online

    In early July, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) simplified access to historic data by putting 77 years’ worth of agricultural statistics online.
    In the past, this information, published in the annual bulletin Agricultural Statistics, was available in print form only.

  • Rain, cooler weather good for area crops

    Rain and cool temperatures continue to benefit corn and soybeans. Isolated portions of Central Illinois still need more rain, while areas of Southeastern Illinois received too much.
    The temperatures across the state averaged 68.8 degrees for the week, 6.5 degrees below normal.
    There were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork last week.
    Topsoil moisture across the state was rated as 2 percent very short, 25 percent short, 69 percent adequate and 4 percent surplus.

  • Precipitation below normal, temps down

    Crops were growing at a steady pace last week and were looking good. However, more rain will be needed to continue this pattern in crop development.
    The weather has been favorable for weeds and pests, so spraying was in full swing last week. Precipitation averaged 0.53 inches throughout the state, 0.27 inches below normal. Temperatures across the state averaged 74.9 degrees for the week, 1.5 degrees below normal.
    There were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork last week.

  • Heritage Days July 26-28

    The American Farm Heritage Museum in Greenville will hold its annual Heritage Days Farm Festival the weekend of July 26-28.
    Included in the festival will be vintage tractors of all makes and models, as well as demonstrations of gas and steam engines.
    A horse pull will be held on Friday, and a truck pull and car show will be held on Sunday. Other activities include: tractor pulls, pedal pulls, threshing demonstrations, a sawmill and live music.
    Admission is $7 for adults. Children age 10 and under are free.

  • Two old-time tractor shows set in area

    The Hillsboro Olde-Tyme Tractor Show will be held this weekend at Old Hillsboro Lake Park.
    Tractors from 1982 and older are eligible to participate. They can be restored or unrestored.
    Also being sought for the show are farm equipment, garden tractors, stationary engines, cars, trucks, pedal tractors and farm-related tools.
    There is no entry fee, and all exhibitors will receive a souvenir show button.
    Among the demonstrations planned for the Saturday and Sunday show are threshing, silage chopping and bale loading.

  • Illinois' winter wheat numbers up

     The Illinois field office of National Agricultural Statistics Service last week released the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s July Crop Production Report. State and national highlights of the report include:
    ILLINOIS

  • Artistry in Agriculture

    Rows of soybeans following the contours of a field west of Vandalia create an artistic pattern as the plants grow.

    Area crops vary widely, with some beans only inches tall, while some corn is already in the silk stage. Virtually all crops are planted now, with the exception of bean re-planting in low areas.

  • Report: Illinois corn acres down, beans up

    The Illinois Field Office of NASS this week released the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s June Acreage and Grain Stocks Reports. Highlights of the report include:
    Corn
    Corn planted in Illinois in 2013 is estimated at 12.2 million acres, unchanged from the March Prospective Plantings Report, and down 600,000  acres from last year.

  • Illinois Farm Bureau rolls out new brand tagline: 'Farm.Family.Food.'

    The Illinois Farm Bureau last week launched an updated brand and new tagline – “Farm. Family. Food.” – in an effort to tell both IFB members and the general public more about who the organization represents and for what it stands.
    “While IFB is known as an advocate for agriculture, we would like to better reflect to our members and public the full scope of what we do,” said IFB President Philip Nelson.