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Farm

  • Area farmers eligible for flooding loans

    Family farmers in 55 Illinois counties  – including Fayette – are now eligible to apply for low-interest emergency loans due to physical and production losses caused by excessive rain, flooding and flash flooding that occurred after April 1 this spring.
    In addition, with a qualifying loss, the designation makes producers eligible for the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Program (SURE).

  • Rural King's move to Orgill facility nearly triples size of former store

    When the Vandalia Rural King store moved to its new location, it was only a couple blocks away.
    But judging by the reaction from customers, the new store is in a different universe.
    "People really like the space, the openness of the store," said store manager John Beck. "There's also a lot more room in the parking lot."
    Now, with more than 100,000 square feet of retail space (compared to less than 40,000 square feet before), the store has expanded many of its existing lines and  added others.

  • Good weather, moisture launch harvest activities across Illinois

    Cooler conditions continued over much of the state last week.
    With small amounts of precipitation across the state, many farmers were able to take full advantage of the favorable weather.
    Many producers are either harvesting or preparing for harvest.
    Other farming activities include fall tillage and planting winter wheat.
    There were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork last week.

  • It's Harvest Time

    Harvest activities started in a big way in Fayette County during the past week. In the first picture, Mitch Johnson drives the combine on the farm owned by his father, Mark Johnson, in the Augsburg area. Many area producers are meeting or exceeding the yields predicted by ag officials.

    To keep the harvest activities going, combine operators frequently unload harvested corn on the fly. In the second photo, Mitch Johnson augers corn into a grain cart being pulled by his grandfather, Tom Johnson.

  • Getting Ready for Survey
  • Farm Briefs

    Dry weather aids corn development

    Very little, if any, precipitation, was received last week across the state, which continued to speed the crops along in their development.

    Temperatures were more moderate last week, with the statewide average temperature being below normal for the first time since early July.

    There were 6.8 days suitable for fieldwork last week across the state, making it a good week to put up good quality hay.

    The corn crop advanced to 87 percent dented, compared to the five-year average of 61 percent.

  • Growmark ends strong financial year

    GROWMARK officials this week reported unaudited, estimated results for the fiscal year that ended Aug. 31.
    Senior Vice President of Finance Jeff Solberg announced sales of $6 billion for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. GROWMARK net income is estimated to be $81 million.

  • Farmland values increase

    Farmland values in Illinois recovered from a mild hiccup in 2009, and so far this year have returned to an upward trend that began after the 1980s farm crisis, according to a recent article in FarmWeek.
    The annual land values and cash rent report, released in August by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, showed Illinois' farm real estate value, a measurement of the value of all land and buildings on farms, increased by $120 per acre from 2009 to 2010. Land now averages $4,650 per acre.

  • Survey shows acreage increases for '11 crops

    Thanks to an improving price outlook, U.S. growers appear ready to increase plantings of corn, soybeans and wheat for harvest in 2011, according to Farm Futures’ first survey of new crop acreage intentions for the coming year.
    Survey results were released this week.
    The survey found that corn acres could increase almost 2 percent in 2011, to 89.5 million acres, compared with 87.9 million  acres sown this spring. That would be the second biggest crop put in since the end of World War II.

  • 'Farmer image' campaign

    New  consumer research by a coalition of farm organizations confirms that Illinois consumers care about who produces their food, but are misinformed about the family farmers who really grow and raise the majority of food produced in Illinois.
    Extensive research from April to July showed the Illinois farmer is still held in substantial esteem by the public. But research also showed consumers have reduced trust in modern farming techniques and profound doubts about how their food is produced.