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Farm

  • Farm Briefs

    Barr named Farm Credit ag scholar
    Amanda Barr of Altamont was selected as one of 25 members of the class of 2011 to be named "We Understand" Agriculture Scholars by Farm Credit Services of Illinois.


    As an ag scholar, she will receive a $1,000 scholarship, to be applied toward her agriculture-related college education.
    She will be studying agriculture business at Lake Land College this fall.
    She is the daughter of Clyde and Barbara Barr.

  • Despite slow start, crops progressing well

    Corn planted in Illinois in 2011 is estimated at 12.5 million acres, down 300,000 acres from the March Prospective Plantings Report, and down 100,000 acres from last year.
    Acreage planted to biotechnology varieties is estimated at 86 percent of the total acreage, up from 82 percent last year. Bt varieties account for 14 percent, herbicide-resistant varieties account for 17 percent and stacked-gene varieties account for 55 percent.
    Planting got off to a slow start in 2011. As of May 1, just 10 percent of the crop was planted, 36 points behind the five-year average.

  • Farm Briefs

    McDowell qualifies for auction contest
    Vandalia auctioneer Andrew McDowell will be competing on June 25 at the World Livestock Auctioneer Contest in Williamston, S.C.
    McDowell is sponsored by Greenville Livestock Auction Inc. He is one of 33 auctioneers from  the United States and Canada who qualified in the top eight in the four regional contests.
    The contest is sponsored by the Livestock Marketing Association.

    Positions open for FSA committee

  • Recycling program set for agrichemical containers

    The Illinois Department of Agriculture is encouraging farmers to save their empty agrichemical containers. The department announced this week that it has arranged to recycle them.    
    Beginning in August, sites throughout the state will collect the containers and grind them into small plastic chips that will be used to make shipping pallets, fence posts, drainage tubing, plastic lumber and other useful products.

  • Late planting impacting corn and soybean insects

    University of Illinois Extension

  • Above-normal rains halt fieldwork in some areas

    Warm weather and sunny skies gave crops a boost early last week before rains brought things to a halt on Friday.
    The average statewide temperature was 75.2 degrees, 4.8 degrees above normal.
    Average statewide precipitation was above normal this week at 1.32 inches. The norm for the time period is 0.92 inches.
    With 4.5 days suitable for fieldwork, some farmers were able to finally finish planting, or re-planting, while others were out spraying herbicides and baling hay.

  • Wet weather woes continue

    As the door closes on one of the weirdest – and wettest – planting seasons in recent memory, Ron Marshel offered an assessment of the situation.

  • Farm Briefs

    Wet conditions slow field work
    Conditions were favorable for crops last week, with warm days and periods of rain. The average statewide temperature was 64 degrees, 1.5 degrees below normal.
    Precipitation was high, averaging 2.83 inches for the state, while the norm for the time period is 1.03 inches.

  • NASCAR fans have opportunity to learn about farming at race

    Illinois farmers have an opportunity to join the Family Farmers High Performance Team, bringing the farm to more than 30,000 NASCAR fans this weekend at Chicagoland Speedway.
    Kenny Wallace, currently the seventh-ranking driver in the NASCAR Nationwide Series, will pilot the "Family Farmers" car in Saturday's race, which will be aired live at 7 p.m. on ESPN.
    Partnered with the television exposure of the "Family Farmers" car, the nearly 18,000-square-foot "Farm Experience" will allow race fans to learn more about farming, and more importantly, meet family farmers themselves.

  • Remember conservation compliance on new land

    This year is shaping up as an interesting one for Illinois crop producers.
    With high commodity prices tempting farmers to use every available acre of land, many producers have purchased or are renting land they aren’t familiar with.