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Farm

  • Wright Insurance Honored

    Bruce Wright, left, and Matthew Wright, right, were presented with two awards for outstanding sales and service of crop insurance by Leigh Lamb, center, the regional marketing manager of Diversified Services.

    Bruce Wright, who owns Bruce Wright Insurance of Vandalia, now qualifies for the Heavy Hitters Club.

  • This year's yields lower

    Fayette County farmers can expect to see corn and soybean yields lower than what they experienced last year, if last Thursday’s crop survey is any indication.

  • Farm Bureau to conduct crop survey on Sept. 8

    The Fayette County Farm Bureau will host its annual crop survey next Thursday.

    On that day, teams will be sent out to all parts of the county to assess the crops.

    The event will start at Robbi's Restaurant at 8:30 a.m. and will last about three hours.

    The day will conclude with a Market Outlook Cookout at 6:30 p.m. at the Fayette County Farm Bureau building at 1125 N. Sunset Drive in Vandalia. Tickets are $5 and are available at the Farm Bureau office or from Farm Bureau directors.

  • Spotty rains last week leave most areas parched

    The average statewide temperature last week was slightly above normal at 73.8 degrees.

    Though most districts received little to no moisture last week, some northern areas received above-normal rainfall for an average of 0.54 inches for the state. The norm for the period is 0.76 inches.

    The rains helped some soybean fields, but in most areas crops remained in need of moisture. Under-filled pods and small beans were evident in a number of fields. Corn remained stressed.

  • High Wire Act

    A group of pigeons gathered on an electric line near the grain elevator in Hagarstown this week. With area corn not yet ready for harvest, the elevator remains quiet enough for the birds to roost undisturbed.

  • Drying Down

    Area corn fields are beginning to turn from green to brown as the crop matures and as dry conditions persist. Soybeans are perhaps being more negatively impacted, as the drought is limiting the plants' ability to fill out the beans within the pods.

  • Looking to 2012

    A tough growing season in 2011 won't dim the hopes of U.S. farmers, who plan to increase production of major crops in the coming year, according to Farm Futures magazine's first survey of 2012 planting intentions.

    Lured by high prices and good profit potential, producers said that they expect to plant record corn acres, along with strong increases for soybeans and wheat.

  • Farm Briefs

    IFB applauds ruling on CDL exemption
    Illinois Farm Bureau leaders this week applauded the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) for listening to farmers’ concerns about the interpretation of agricultural transportation regulations and commercial drivers’ license provisions.

  • August crop report

    ILLINOIS
    The 2011 Illinois corn crop is expected to yield 170 bushels per acre, up 13 bushels from last year’s yield. Production of corn for grain would be 2.09 billion bushels, up 7 percent from 2010. Generally wet conditions led to a slower planting season than is typical, but warmer-than-average temperatures have allowed the crop progress to keep pace with the five-year average.

  • Cooler temps favorable for crop growth in state

    Slightly cooler weather and scattered showers across much of the state made for a favorable growing week, and was a welcomed change from the hot and dry conditions experienced throughout the summer thus far. Statewide, temperatures averaged 72.5 degrees last week, 1.2 degrees below normal.
    The northern portion of the state experienced slightly above-normal precipitation; however, statewide precipitation was nearly 0.2 inches below average, ending the week at 0.65 inches.