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Farm

  • Farm Briefs

    Website connects farmers to world
    Today’s farmers and ranchers are so busy increasing their productivity to meet the needs of a growing world that they don’t have time to sit and visit with their neighbors like they used to. However, there is still great value in building relationships, sharing information and asking for advice.
    A new website and mobile application, cropnation, will allow farmers and ranchers to connect with each other, whether they are across the country or across the section.

  • FSA program deadlines set

    Several deadlines are approaching for Illinois USDA Farm Service Agency programs.
    NAP coverage is required on all non-insurable crops, and crop insurance is required on insurable crops to remain eligible for most disaster programs.
     Among the deadlines are:
    Aug. 31 – Final application closing date for 2012 Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage on canola.

  • Assistance now available for heat-related livestock deaths

    Producers who have lost livestock due to excessively  hot temperatures may have help available.
    Scherrie Giamanco, state executive director of the Illinois Farm Service Agency, this week reminded producers that the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) provides financial assistance for livestock deaths as a direct result of adverse weather conditions.
    "The hot, dry conditions that are widespread across Illinois may be good for the development of crops," Giamanco said. "However, they have proven to be detrimental for livestock producers."

  • Heat continues, though some areas receive rain

    Rainfall was sporadic throughout the state. Some counties reported continuing dry conditions, while others experienced flooding. Damage to crops and livestock due to flooding was reported.
    Precipitation across the state averaged 1.52 inches, 0.68 inches above normal, though most areas are still experiencing dry conditions.

  • Farm Heritage Days

    The American Farm Heritage Museum in Greenville held its annual Farm Heritage Days last Friday, Saturday and Sunday. In the first photo, Mike Myers of Altamont drives his 1948 International M during a tractor pull on Saturday afternoon. In the second photo is a variety of Allis Chalmers tractors; Allis Chalmers was the featured tractor at this year's event.

  • Feeling the heat

    The longer the heat wave lingers over the Midwest, the more concerned area farmers become. And if the unusual weather pattern hasn’t already hurt yields, experts say that it won’t be long until it does.
    “It’s been a long time since we’ve had a prolonged heat wave like this,” said Ron Marshel, manager of the Fayette County Farm Bureau. “And even though we’ve gotten enough moisture to keep the plants going, the heat has taken a toll.”

  • July crop report

    ILLINOIS CROPS
    WHEAT: The Illinois wheat yield for the 2011 crop is estimated to average 61 bushels per acre, based on the July 1 surveys, down one bushel per acre from the June forecast. Total production would be 43.9 million bushels, more than 2.5 times the 2010 production of 16.5 million bushels.
    Acreage expected to be harvested for grain is 720,000, more than double the harvested acres in 2010. As of July 3, 75 percent of the wheat acres were harvested, compared to 82 percent last year and the five-year average of 70 percent.

  • Heat, lack of rain are affecting crops

    Statewide temperatures were 2.2 degrees above normal last week, averaging 78.4 degrees.
    Precipitation averaged 0.51 inches, 0.19 inches below normal. The far southern districts of the state received more than  1 inch of rain. Northern areas, however, were again below average in rainfall. Topsoil moisture was rated 9 percent very short, 29 percent short, 54 percent adequate and 8 percent surplus.
    Hot and dry crops were beginning to show stress.

  • Corn acres higher than expected; prices may fall

    With the release of USDA’s June Grain Stocks and Acreage reports comes a fundamental shift in the corn market, suggesting that corn prices will come under considerable pressure, according to University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good.

  • Farm Briefs

    USDA reinstates farm labor survey
    In July, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will resume its Agricultural Labor Survey after the U.S. Department of Labor agreed to pay its costs. NASS suspended the survey in April due to budget constraints.