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Farm

  • July crop report

    ILLINOIS CROPS
    WHEAT: The Illinois wheat yield for the 2011 crop is estimated to average 61 bushels per acre, based on the July 1 surveys, down one bushel per acre from the June forecast. Total production would be 43.9 million bushels, more than 2.5 times the 2010 production of 16.5 million bushels.
    Acreage expected to be harvested for grain is 720,000, more than double the harvested acres in 2010. As of July 3, 75 percent of the wheat acres were harvested, compared to 82 percent last year and the five-year average of 70 percent.

  • Heat, lack of rain are affecting crops

    Statewide temperatures were 2.2 degrees above normal last week, averaging 78.4 degrees.
    Precipitation averaged 0.51 inches, 0.19 inches below normal. The far southern districts of the state received more than  1 inch of rain. Northern areas, however, were again below average in rainfall. Topsoil moisture was rated 9 percent very short, 29 percent short, 54 percent adequate and 8 percent surplus.
    Hot and dry crops were beginning to show stress.

  • Corn acres higher than expected; prices may fall

    With the release of USDA’s June Grain Stocks and Acreage reports comes a fundamental shift in the corn market, suggesting that corn prices will come under considerable pressure, according to University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good.

  • Farm Briefs

    USDA reinstates farm labor survey
    In July, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will resume its Agricultural Labor Survey after the U.S. Department of Labor agreed to pay its costs. NASS suspended the survey in April due to budget constraints.

  • Smooth as Silk

    Most area corn plants – like this one in a field southwest of Vandalia – have moved into the silking stage.

    Hot weather has produced significant growth in recent days, but some plants are beginning to show signs of stress as dry conditions persist.

  • Illinois crop yield survey data to be collected soon

    Enumerators representing the Illinois Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service will soon begin collecting data that will be used to estimate the corn and soybean yields that Illinois farmers will harvest this year.

  • USDA invites signup for value-added farm grants

    Illinois USDA Rural Development State Director Colleen Callahan announced that applications are being accepted for grants to provide financial assistance to independent producers, farmer and rancher cooperatives, majority-controlled producer-based business ventures and agricultural producer groups through the Value-Added Producer Grant Program.

  • Corn Growth Affected By Rains

    Many area corn fields resemble rolling waves as the plants' height varies from 18 inches to 6 feet – depending on where the crops are in the field.

    Standing water in low-lying fields has stunted plants, or, in some cases, killed them. Conversely, corn in well-drained fields is entering the silking phase. 

  • Farm Briefs

    Barr named Farm Credit ag scholar
    Amanda Barr of Altamont was selected as one of 25 members of the class of 2011 to be named "We Understand" Agriculture Scholars by Farm Credit Services of Illinois.


    As an ag scholar, she will receive a $1,000 scholarship, to be applied toward her agriculture-related college education.
    She will be studying agriculture business at Lake Land College this fall.
    She is the daughter of Clyde and Barbara Barr.

  • Despite slow start, crops progressing well

    Corn planted in Illinois in 2011 is estimated at 12.5 million acres, down 300,000 acres from the March Prospective Plantings Report, and down 100,000 acres from last year.
    Acreage planted to biotechnology varieties is estimated at 86 percent of the total acreage, up from 82 percent last year. Bt varieties account for 14 percent, herbicide-resistant varieties account for 17 percent and stacked-gene varieties account for 55 percent.
    Planting got off to a slow start in 2011. As of May 1, just 10 percent of the crop was planted, 36 points behind the five-year average.