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Farm

  • Waiting on the Weather

    Though area farmers got in a little fieldwork before the rains returned, much of that work came to a halt last week when heavy rains hit the area.

    This tractor and tillage equipment sits stranded in a soggy field north of Vandalia. Very little of the state's corn has been planted.

  • Doing battle with soybean cyst nematode

    Southern Illinois University Carbondale is helping Midwest soybean farmers combat a parasitic roundworm – the soybean cyst nematode, sometimes referred to as the “billion dollar pest.” And they are using the soybean itself to do it.

  • Corn Impact

    The difference in corn prices between 2012 and 2013 means a nearly $7.5 billion loss to the Illinois economy.
    Data resulting from an analysis conducted by Western Illinois University’s (WIU) Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs clearly illustrate the close tie between a strong corn industry and economic activity across the state of Illinois.
    “When corn prices are strong, the impacts are felt statewide,” said Gary Hudson, Illinois Corn Growers Association (ICGA) president.

  • Heavy rains, cool temps halt fieldwork in state

    Severe storms and heavy rainfall continued throughout the state last week.

  • Illinois: Corn acres down 1 percent, beans up 1 percent

    Illinois corn growers  intend to plant 11.9 million acres of corn in 2014, down 1 percent from 2013.
    Soybean planted area is expected to total 9.5 million acres, up 1 percent from the previous year.
    Sorghum is expected to be planted in 30,000 acres, up 30 percent from 2013.
    Winter wheat area seeded last fall is estimated at 740,000 acres, down 15 percent from the previous year.
    The area planted to oats is expected to total 35,000 acres, down 12 percent from 2013.

  • Big year ahead for soybeans

    Producers surveyed across the United States intend to plant an estimated 81.5 million acres of soybeans in 2014, up 6 percent from last year and an all-time record high, according to the Prospective Plantings report released this week by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS).

  • Hitting the Fields – and the Roads

    With the arrival of warmer and dryer weather, farmers have been in the fields this past week doing tillage work and applying anhydrous ammonia.

    The beginning of fieldwork means that motorists will be more likely to encounter tractors as they move to the fields. Use caution, and give them plenty of room.

  • Cool spring temperatures continuing

    Early spring temperatures were cool throughout the state for the month of March.
    Many farmers were moving machinery out of storage and getting it ready for the season.
    Temperatures averaged 33.3 degrees, which is 7.6 degrees below normal.
    Statewide precipitation averaged 1.49 inches, 1.61 inches below normal. Topsoil moisture was rated at 2 percent very short, 15 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture was rated 7 percent very short, 29 percent short, 62 percent adequate and 2 percent surplus.

  • Farm Briefs

    Illinois to receive specialty crop grants

      The Illinois Department of Agriculture is now accepting proposals for federal specialty crop grants.
    The agency has been notified that Illinois will receive a share of the funds and will be instructed to begin the proposal selection process. The exact amount of the award has not been determined.

  • 2013 Illinois corn, beans yields