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Today's Features

  • Herb Woolsey was released from active duty with the Army Infantry in September 1953. However, in early 1954, an armored tank unit in Vandalia needed a company commander, and Woolsey was asked to take the job.

    He did and remained with the reserve unit as the commander until June 30, 1985, when it was disbanded. He served 34 years in the service and retired a colonel. An all-American patriot, he is often asked to speak at Memorial Day and Veterans Day events.

  • When Charlie Durbin was a young boy living on his parents’ farm, he knew that he wanted to be a veterinarian. He also knew that he especially wanted to work with cattle.

    Last Tuesday evening, Dr. Charlie R. Durbin hosted a community cookout in St.Peter City Park in celebration of 25 years in St. Peter doing just what that little 8-year-old boy dreamed of … and more.

    He has served all of Fayette County, including serving 15 years on the Fayette County Fair Board and as the county fair veterinarian, a position he still holds.

  • Down syndrome is usually described as a congenital defect caused by an extra chromosome, characterized by moderate to severe mental retardation and marked physical traits that are often easily identifiable in the person with the condition.

    The above information can be found in medical books and dictionaries. What is not described are the initial heartbreak, struggles and coping of the parents and, especially, the very special gifts ­ the unexpected joys, triumphs, love, sweetness of spirit and affection brought by the child with Down syndrome.

  • When U.S. Navy veteran, Robyn Pontious, learned of the need for guardians to travel with World War II veterans to visit the WWII Memorial in Washington, D.C, she answered the call.

    Moreover, she arranged for her sister, Kelly Washburn, to serve also as a guardian.

    The enthusiasm the two sisters share over the experience is approached only by the compassion they show for the two veterans’ emotional reactions as waiting American citizens met them with respect, displays of gratitude and recognition of their service to their country during WWII.

  • Leroy “Bud” Taylor has been a “builder” most of his life. The Taylor name has long been synonymous with integrity, honesty and dependability in the business of construction, whether it be a church, houses, businesses or various other jobs handled by Taylor Construction.

    “Bud” shares his story, which also proves to be a tribute to his late father, Forrest Taylor, another well-known and respected name in Fayette County.

    Meet Bud and Mary Ann Taylor as they welcome us into their lovely Vandalia home.

    Bud’s Early Memories

  • One-hundred and five years ago, the World’s Fair was in full swing in Forest Park in St. Louis. Some of the amazing facts about that event were: it featured an 18-foot high lighthouse built of pure salt; there were 142 miles of exhibits in the eight main places for people to explore; and 90 million feet of pine was used in constructing the framework for the buildings.

    And the same year, 1904, a little girl was born in St. Louis to Ann Gibbons Kupferer, whose parents were emigrants from Ireland, and Charles Andrew Kupferer, whose parents came to this country from Germany.

  • Fifty years ago, Iris Kruenegel and her friend and neighbor, Carol (then Wasmuth) Fenton, thought it would be fun and relaxing for their friends and neighbors in rural Shobonier to have a “girls only” card club.

    Thus, the Country Cousins card club was born.

    Several of the original members still meet, along with newer members, for their monthly “girls night out,” rotating as hosts for their gatherings.

  • Tammie Rogers and her husband, Robert, who live and operate their Darn Far Ranch northwest of Brownstown are doing what they love to do best – working with and training dogs…and the dogs’ humans.

    Sometimes, a really special dog comes along that is needed by a special person. Tammie recently shared this touching story that has a happy, tail-wagging ending. “Bree” is that special dog and Kevin Boston of Greenville the special person.

  • Last week, the Faulkner family – Rev. Raymond; his wife, Mollie; and daughter, Pricilla – were introduced, as they shared the story of Rev. Raymond’s decision to design and build a dream home for his wife, doing all the work himself, with the help of only Priscilla.

    Rev. Raymond began the project in 2002, after two years of purchasing and storing all the materials and supplies he would need for the 10-room two-story house, with five bathrooms, a utility room and large balcony.

  • Approximately nine years ago, the Rev. Raymond P. Faulkner decided to build a house … not a run-of-the-mill house, one designed and drawn on blueprints by a professional. Nor did he want it built by professionals.

    He wanted to build the dream house of wife Mollie and daughter Priscilla, with the emphasis on “home,” not “house,” a “home that love built.”

    A minister, not a professional carpenter, he set about to accomplish the self-appointed task.