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Today's Features

  • Tammie Rogers and her husband, Robert, who live and operate their Darn Far Ranch northwest of Brownstown are doing what they love to do best – working with and training dogs…and the dogs’ humans.

    Sometimes, a really special dog comes along that is needed by a special person. Tammie recently shared this touching story that has a happy, tail-wagging ending. “Bree” is that special dog and Kevin Boston of Greenville the special person.

  • Last week, the Faulkner family – Rev. Raymond; his wife, Mollie; and daughter, Pricilla – were introduced, as they shared the story of Rev. Raymond’s decision to design and build a dream home for his wife, doing all the work himself, with the help of only Priscilla.

    Rev. Raymond began the project in 2002, after two years of purchasing and storing all the materials and supplies he would need for the 10-room two-story house, with five bathrooms, a utility room and large balcony.

  • Approximately nine years ago, the Rev. Raymond P. Faulkner decided to build a house … not a run-of-the-mill house, one designed and drawn on blueprints by a professional. Nor did he want it built by professionals.

    He wanted to build the dream house of wife Mollie and daughter Priscilla, with the emphasis on “home,” not “house,” a “home that love built.”

    A minister, not a professional carpenter, he set about to accomplish the self-appointed task.

  • Last Thursday, six 4-H kids and their leaders and escorts visited the Sefton Unit HCE Club, delighting the ladies as they brought and explained their 4-H projects…even “Chad,” the rooster, live and in person.

    The 4-H program has a record of longevity, as it was founded more than 70 years ago, and still remains a large part of the attractions at county and state fairs.

  • Gary Smith went to Santa Cru, South America, last year on a construction mission, and the experience opened his eyes about how fortunate Americans are.

    “We don’t realize how blessed we are. Simple things in South America, like turning on tap water, safe water to drink is not available. We take it for granted,” he said.

  • Tracy Jones decided about 15 years ago that she wanted to be sure her family was eating healthy, nourishing and flavorful foods, so she decided to raise their own food, and process and preserve it herself.

    She consulted with her mother – who always canned, as did her mother before her – and began continuing the family tradition.

    “I’ve been canning since I was 20 or 21. My mother, Martha Rambo, taught me,” Tracy said.

  • Lisa Robbins wears more than one hat…and is more than happy to do so.

    She loves children and feels she has the best of both worlds, as she teaches kindergarten at Jefferson School during the school year and works with them in the summer as manager of the Vandalia Municipal Swimming Pool.

    She will begin her 24th year teaching kindergarten this year, and has worked at the swimming pool for 30 years.

    She began working at the pool as a lifeguard.

  • We often perceive others only on the surface, a part of a group or team, a familiar face expected to be seen in a certain setting, without thought of that person being considered as an individual.

  • The scene opens on a young woman, her emotions obviously intense and personal. She had received word of her soldier husband’s return home after months of not knowing if he was even alive.

    A voice-over of a male speaks the words of her husband’s letters as she gets ready for the day… and leaving the viewer intensely interested and wanting the movie to continue with the story.

    This is the trailer for the film, “As Ever, Stan,” written and directed by Alex Schwarm.

  • Peter “Pete” Sutherland Jr. had stories within a story to tell about his family, and he has told those stories in his recently published book, “The Five Sutherland Boys – A Family Saga.”

    The “five boys” are Pete’s father, the late Peter Sutherland Sr. and his four uncles, Willie, Johnny, Louis “Fat” and Luther.

    The book features the exploits of Louis, who was nicknamed “Fat” as a boy. Though the nickname did not describe his physical appearance, it was moniker that stuck to him until death.