.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • “Parkinson's is a long, lonely road … for the afflicted and for the caregivers. It’s just as bad as Alzheimer’s. At least with Alzheimer’s, they are still moving. With Parkinson’s, everything shuts down, and it’s a long, lonely road.”

    These are the words of Charlene “Pokie” Pryor, as she described the disease that began to claim her lifestyle when she had two grand mal seizures in 1996.

  • Many of our readers are familiar with the music and ministry of Laurel Jean, who has been blind since birth. Her gift of reaching people spiritually and joyfully through her music, as a creative pianist, composer, vocalist and speaker, has blessed many through her ministry.

  • More people are reaching the age of 100 years these days, but probably few of them are retaining the energy, mental capacity, enthusiasm and appearance of Erma L. Warner.

    Erma seems to have put the brakes on aging at about 75, although she reached her 100th birthday on Dec. 17, 2008, and celebrated it with a party.

    When Erma was called to set up an interview, she gave detailed directions to her rural home, down to the finer details of “you will cross a crick and go up a hill, to the second mailbox.”

  • Twenty-four years ago, Jerry Stine donned a red suit and white beard for a Four Mile Church Christmas celebration, and it has become his “seasonal uniform” every Christmas since.

    Stine has become a Christmas-time regular at the Golden Circle Nutrition Senior Citizens building in Vandalia for several years.

  • Sally (Bergin) Behrends and her brother, Harold Bergin, remembered the bells their father used to put on his horses when they pulled the sleigh at Christmastime.

    Although it was a common sight and sound in those days, a local newspaper in February 1936 referred to their father, John Bergin, driving his sleigh to town as a “spectacular sight.”

    The newspaper article also stated that it was “a fine looking sleigh, all polished and ornamental, with two different sets of bells, one large set and the other smaller.”

  • Usually, when one thinks of barbershop singing, one pictures men in old-fashioned shirts and striped vests, ties and “garters” on their shirt sleeves, their hair parted in the center and even sporting long, luxurious handlebar mustaches.

    The award-winning “Sweet Adelines,” a group of harmonizing ladies, has provided quite a different picture.

    Jean Freeman of Vandalia is a member of this group and part of the performance that recently won the award for the best small chorus in the world, the Harmony Achievement Award.

  •   This Christmas season is a milestone in Bobby “Bob” Cox’s life. It marks 50 years of singing in a church choir and 50 years of performing and/or directing Christmas Cantatas and concerts – well over half of his age of 79. 

  • Hulda and Clifford Nickels, who are celebrating their 98th Christmases this year, reached back into their memories to recall Christmases of many years ago.

    They were both born in 1910, and met and married much later in their lives. They lived south on Ill. Route 185 for years, until moving to Fayette County Hospital Long Term Care several years ago. They seem very content in their room, which is furnished with comfortable furniture and personalized with their own belongings and family pictures.

  • When Norma Englejohn was just a little girl, she knew she wanted to be a nurse.

    “I was born and raised in Loogootee,” she said, “and I honestly can’t remember when I didn’t want to be a nurse.”

    That goal never changed, and further influenced by her pastor’s wife, who was a retired registered nurse, she attained her goal, graduating from Deaconess School of Nursing in St. Louis in 1960.

    Her career with Fayette County Hospital actually began in 1958, when she worked as a nurse’s aide while attending nursing school.

  • Paul McConkey operated the Victory Lane Service Station and Convenience Store in Brownstown for 16 1/2 years, something he began in 1992, because he saw a need in the community.

    And it proved to be something he enjoyed over the years.

    However, Sept. 30 was his last day in the business, as he handed the keys over to a new owner.

    “I don’t think of it as retiring,” McConkey said, “It was a chapter in my life, and now I’m just going on to another chapter.”